• Announcements

    • Lindsay

      National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016   05/01/2016

      Proclamation 9433 of April 28, 2016 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016 A Proclamation Nearly 44 million American adults, and millions of children, experience mental health conditions each year, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress. Although we have made progress expanding mental health coverage and elevating the conversation about mental health, too many people still do not get the help they need. Our Nation is founded on the belief that we must look out for one another—and whether it affects our family members, friends, co-workers, or those unknown to us—we do a service for each other when we reach out and help those struggling with mental health issues. This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve. In the last 7 years, our country has made extraordinary progress in expanding mental health coverage for more people across America. The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, requires coverage of mental health and substance use disorder services in individual and small group markets, and expands mental health and substance use disorder parity policies, which are estimated to help more than 60 million Americans. Nearly 15 million more Americans have gained Medicaid coverage since October 2013, significantly improving access to mental health care. And because of more than $100 million in funding from the Affordable Care Act, community health centers have expanded behavioral health services for nearly 900,000 people nationwide over the past 2 years. Still, far too few Americans experiencing mental illnesses do not receive the care and treatment they need. That is why my most recent Budget proposal includes a new half-billion dollar investment to improve access to mental health care, engage individuals with serious mental illness in care, and help ensure behavioral health care systems work for everyone. Our Nation has made strong advances in improving prevention, increasing early intervention, and expanding treatment of mental illnesses. Earlier this year, I established a Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity Task Force, which aims to ensure that coverage for mental health benefits is comparable to coverage for medical and surgical care, improve understanding of the requirements of the law, and expand compliance with it. Mental health should be treated as part of a person's overall health, and we must ensure individuals living with mental health conditions can get the treatment they need. My Administration also continues to invest in science and research through the BRAIN initiative to enhance our understanding of the complexities of the human brain and to make it easier to diagnose and treat mental health disorders early. One of our most profound obligations as a Nation is to support the men and women in uniform who return home and continue fighting battles against mental illness. Last year, I signed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which fills critical gaps in serving veterans with post-traumatic stress and other illnesses, increases peer support and outreach, and recruits more talented individuals to work on mental health issues at the Department of Veterans Affairs. This law will make it easier for veterans to get the care they need when they need it. All Americans, including service members, can get immediate assistance by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling 1-800-662-HELP. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we recognize those Americans who live with mental illness and substance use disorders, and we pledge solidarity with their families who need our support as well. Let us strive to ensure people living with mental health conditions know that they are not alone, that hope exists, and that the possibility of healing and thriving is real. Together, we can help everyone get the support they need to recover as they continue along the journey to get well. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2016 as National Mental Health Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise mental health awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.  
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
john1157

Does Boredom Contribute To Your Depression

17 posts in this topic

Posted

I've often wondered how much of depression is a direct result of boredom. Boredom results from too little stimulation, motivation and interest in things. Depression however causes a lack of interst in everything and it seems that the 2 feed off each other. I often wonder which came first, the boredom or the depression. Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You might also be interested in:

Posted

I've often wondered how much of depression is a direct result of boredom. Boredom results from too little stimulation, motivation and interest in things. Depression however causes a lack of interst in everything and it seems that the 2 feed off each other. I often wonder which came first, the boredom or the depression. Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?

If will be different for each person I guess...for me I know my first few depressive episodes were definitely not caused by boredom. However, as i've got used to having depression over the years, i've seen my friends less often and reduced the number of activities i've been involved with. I've struggled with fatigue, so the less i've attempted to do. The less I do, probably the more tired and depressed I get.

So, now, yes the boredom does feed the depression. It's a very viscious circle which I'm finding impossible to break!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?

Both are major contributing factors to the other in my opinion, although there can be many other reasons involved.

Treating boredom with healthy activity always treats my depression to some degree, and treating my depression makes me more capable of escaping boredom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Yes. When we're feeling depressed it makes sense that being alone with our thoughts is not a good thing. It's best to try and do something to distract yourself and not isolate yourself. I definitely find it hard to follow that advice though, doing the right thing just doesn't feel like the right thing when you are depressed. I agree that it is a viscious circle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?

last night i was bored and that seemed to turn into depression. then i talk to depressed people and get even more depressed.

as for the answer, i'm not sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I agree with everyone here that boredom does contribute to depression. Yesterday I was so bored and my mood was starting to go down hill again. Once something decent comes on tv or I jump online I start feeling better again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Hi John,

There's no doubt boredom is a part of depression. The illness itself removes all our joy from everything we used to enjoy so we doin't have choices. We sit, sleep, stare and panic as we can't think of anything we want to or can do. We need to fill our time with thoughts outside depression but the illness won't let us do that either.

It wants us totally. All our attention, all our thoughts and emotions. Thus boredom is a killer.

How to stop it of course is the big question and the answer is really only by recovering. Distraction from all our negative thoughts is essential in that recovery and anything that stops us dwelling on depression and our nothing ness is worth a try.

Best

Friendly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

oh for sure it does...

I was laid..of..nothing to do

so now on prozac...

but I find..boredom and nothing to do...in a day...makes for anxietys and muscle tension also,..anyone else

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I find that when I'm doing something and I'm not bored, that my depression improves. However, when I'm feeling depressed, I can't find the motivation to do anything and end up bored. It's kind of a vicious cycle :hearts:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?

Both are major contributing factors to the other in my opinion, although there can be many other reasons involved.

Treating boredom with healthy activity always treats my depression to some degree, and treating my depression makes me more capable of escaping boredom.

i don't think i could have said it any better then what burgy has stated. (well stated burgy)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I agree with kilo. Occasionally being bored makes me depressed. But most often I become bored because I'm depressed, at least that's what happens lately. I can't focus on anything, and none of my favorite activities interest me. Ergo, I'm bored because I'm depressed. But then that boredom makes me more depressed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Yes it does contribute for me. I find that if I can find something to keep my mind busy and distract me from the way I am feeling it helps a lot. I sometimes go for a drive in the car, concentrating on driving and the traffic around me is a good distraction. I also try to do something creative like drawing, that helps. Or I might do some research on the internet and try to learn something new. I think anything that can get your thinking engaged and away from how you are feeling helps a lot. Otherwise you kind of "stew in your own juices" and it just makes things worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I am bored because of my depression. When I wasn't so depressed (when I was on diet pills in the early 80's) I wasn't bored. But now, I am not on diet pills, just depression meds, and still bored. Nothing interests me much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Being isolated & having not much to do that is interesting makes me bored. The boredom then leads into depression. Depression, however, is an entirely different ballgame than boredom. Boredom is the insect biting at the plant. Depression is the disease the plant has acquired by the insect and other varmints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I think in my case it does contribute. A lot. One of my problems is that when I get bored/don't have anything to do, I start thinking too much, and my mind ends up going into such a dark place. Then I get upset. I have to keep myself busy, or I get...I don't even know how to describe it. I have things that I try to do when I know I'm reaching that point. Like games and stuff. Sometimes that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Yes for me it does. Or it could be the other way round.

I know when I'm very depressed I completely lose interest in everything around me.

A couple of things don't help me. Firstly I'm very isolated - spend far too much time on my own. Secondly my job doesn't stimulate me, so my mind tends to wander - that usually means I end up thinking about my depression, often to the exclusion of everything else.

So it's a bit of a vicious circle. However I do try to keep myself busy - I think that's really important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Hi

I have found that when I have been busy doing something interesting, it energises me and I begin to do - and enjoy - more of the things that I like. And from what I have seen here, everyone has the same pattern (as do I) - you get bored, you start to think, you start becoming depressed and lose energy; then it just becomes harder and harder to get re-started again and you get what I call "whirlpooled" - sucked into a type of depressive vortex.

So - I think the thing is to break the cycle with very small and progressive steps. I found that my boredom in the new job was alleviated by reading online at first (reading books seems far more difficult for me).

Then seeing a therapist - mine always seems to add energy. And then you can begin... 1 small thing, becomes 2, becomes 4...and slowly your energy levels begin to rise again.

So, in my experience, try and catch those subtle signs that thigs are slipping. I also find that meditation helps me a lot.

It takes time to get into it - but if you have access to youtube there are many different videos which show how to meditate and what the techniques are

Stay engaged and keep your mind alive - it does work - and be patient with yourself - it takes time to rebuild the castle

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0