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Does Boredom Contribute To Your Depression


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#1 john1157

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 06:37 AM

I've often wondered how much of depression is a direct result of boredom. Boredom results from too little stimulation, motivation and interest in things. Depression however causes a lack of interst in everything and it seems that the 2 feed off each other. I often wonder which came first, the boredom or the depression. Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?

#2 malaysiared

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 11:11 AM

I've often wondered how much of depression is a direct result of boredom. Boredom results from too little stimulation, motivation and interest in things. Depression however causes a lack of interst in everything and it seems that the 2 feed off each other. I often wonder which came first, the boredom or the depression. Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?


If will be different for each person I guess...for me I know my first few depressive episodes were definitely not caused by boredom. However, as i've got used to having depression over the years, i've seen my friends less often and reduced the number of activities i've been involved with. I've struggled with fatigue, so the less i've attempted to do. The less I do, probably the more tired and depressed I get.

So, now, yes the boredom does feed the depression. It's a very viscious circle which I'm finding impossible to break!

#3 Burgy

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 11:23 AM

Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?

Both are major contributing factors to the other in my opinion, although there can be many other reasons involved.

Treating boredom with healthy activity always treats my depression to some degree, and treating my depression makes me more capable of escaping boredom.

Posted Image We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world. ~Buddha

#4 fed_up

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 12:22 PM

Yes. When we're feeling depressed it makes sense that being alone with our thoughts is not a good thing. It's best to try and do something to distract yourself and not isolate yourself. I definitely find it hard to follow that advice though, doing the right thing just doesn't feel like the right thing when you are depressed. I agree that it is a viscious circle.

#5 simpleblue

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 04:56 PM

Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?

last night i was bored and that seemed to turn into depression. then i talk to depressed people and get even more depressed.

as for the answer, i'm not sure.
Posted ImagePosted Image

#6 livingwithBPD

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 10:47 PM

I agree with everyone here that boredom does contribute to depression. Yesterday I was so bored and my mood was starting to go down hill again. Once something decent comes on tv or I jump online I start feeling better again.

#7 Guest_friendlyone_*

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 11:36 PM

Hi John,

There's no doubt boredom is a part of depression. The illness itself removes all our joy from everything we used to enjoy so we doin't have choices. We sit, sleep, stare and panic as we can't think of anything we want to or can do. We need to fill our time with thoughts outside depression but the illness won't let us do that either.

It wants us totally. All our attention, all our thoughts and emotions. Thus boredom is a killer.

How to stop it of course is the big question and the answer is really only by recovering. Distraction from all our negative thoughts is essential in that recovery and anything that stops us dwelling on depression and our nothing ness is worth a try.

Best

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#8 kassiegal

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 05:28 PM

oh for sure it does...
I was laid..of..nothing to do
so now on prozac...
but I find..boredom and nothing to do...in a day...makes for anxietys and muscle tension also,..anyone else

#9 kilo

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 06:00 PM

I find that when I'm doing something and I'm not bored, that my depression improves. However, when I'm feeling depressed, I can't find the motivation to do anything and end up bored. It's kind of a vicious cycle :hearts:

#10 SecretMist

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 08:19 PM

Is depression a result of boredom or is boredom a result of depression?

Both are major contributing factors to the other in my opinion, although there can be many other reasons involved.

Treating boredom with healthy activity always treats my depression to some degree, and treating my depression makes me more capable of escaping boredom.


i don't think i could have said it any better then what burgy has stated. (well stated burgy)

#11 AngelOfTheMoor

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 08:58 PM

I agree with kilo. Occasionally being bored makes me depressed. But most often I become bored because I'm depressed, at least that's what happens lately. I can't focus on anything, and none of my favorite activities interest me. Ergo, I'm bored because I'm depressed. But then that boredom makes me more depressed.

#12 breezin

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 07:32 AM

Yes it does contribute for me. I find that if I can find something to keep my mind busy and distract me from the way I am feeling it helps a lot. I sometimes go for a drive in the car, concentrating on driving and the traffic around me is a good distraction. I also try to do something creative like drawing, that helps. Or I might do some research on the internet and try to learn something new. I think anything that can get your thinking engaged and away from how you are feeling helps a lot. Otherwise you kind of "stew in your own juices" and it just makes things worse.

#13 markofkane

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Posted 25 July 2009 - 05:23 AM

I am bored because of my depression. When I wasn't so depressed (when I was on diet pills in the early 80's) I wasn't bored. But now, I am not on diet pills, just depression meds, and still bored. Nothing interests me much.

#14 gentle sun

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Posted 25 July 2009 - 07:08 AM

Being isolated & having not much to do that is interesting makes me bored. The boredom then leads into depression. Depression, however, is an entirely different ballgame than boredom. Boredom is the insect biting at the plant. Depression is the disease the plant has acquired by the insect and other varmints.

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#15 kakurebasho

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 01:50 AM

I think in my case it does contribute. A lot. One of my problems is that when I get bored/don't have anything to do, I start thinking too much, and my mind ends up going into such a dark place. Then I get upset. I have to keep myself busy, or I get...I don't even know how to describe it. I have things that I try to do when I know I'm reaching that point. Like games and stuff. Sometimes that helps.

#16 plutoman

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 04:16 AM

Yes for me it does. Or it could be the other way round.
I know when I'm very depressed I completely lose interest in everything around me.
A couple of things don't help me. Firstly I'm very isolated - spend far too much time on my own. Secondly my job doesn't stimulate me, so my mind tends to wander - that usually means I end up thinking about my depression, often to the exclusion of everything else.
So it's a bit of a vicious circle. However I do try to keep myself busy - I think that's really important.
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#17 Musicafrica

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 04:42 AM

Hi
I have found that when I have been busy doing something interesting, it energises me and I begin to do - and enjoy - more of the things that I like. And from what I have seen here, everyone has the same pattern (as do I) - you get bored, you start to think, you start becoming depressed and lose energy; then it just becomes harder and harder to get re-started again and you get what I call "whirlpooled" - sucked into a type of depressive vortex.
So - I think the thing is to break the cycle with very small and progressive steps. I found that my boredom in the new job was alleviated by reading online at first (reading books seems far more difficult for me).
Then seeing a therapist - mine always seems to add energy. And then you can begin... 1 small thing, becomes 2, becomes 4...and slowly your energy levels begin to rise again.
So, in my experience, try and catch those subtle signs that thigs are slipping. I also find that meditation helps me a lot.

It takes time to get into it - but if you have access to youtube there are many different videos which show how to meditate and what the techniques are

Stay engaged and keep your mind alive - it does work - and be patient with yourself - it takes time to rebuild the castle
Mark




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