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      National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016   05/01/2016

      Proclamation 9433 of April 28, 2016 National Mental Health Awareness Month, 2016 A Proclamation Nearly 44 million American adults, and millions of children, experience mental health conditions each year, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress. Although we have made progress expanding mental health coverage and elevating the conversation about mental health, too many people still do not get the help they need. Our Nation is founded on the belief that we must look out for one another—and whether it affects our family members, friends, co-workers, or those unknown to us—we do a service for each other when we reach out and help those struggling with mental health issues. This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve. In the last 7 years, our country has made extraordinary progress in expanding mental health coverage for more people across America. The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, requires coverage of mental health and substance use disorder services in individual and small group markets, and expands mental health and substance use disorder parity policies, which are estimated to help more than 60 million Americans. Nearly 15 million more Americans have gained Medicaid coverage since October 2013, significantly improving access to mental health care. And because of more than $100 million in funding from the Affordable Care Act, community health centers have expanded behavioral health services for nearly 900,000 people nationwide over the past 2 years. Still, far too few Americans experiencing mental illnesses do not receive the care and treatment they need. That is why my most recent Budget proposal includes a new half-billion dollar investment to improve access to mental health care, engage individuals with serious mental illness in care, and help ensure behavioral health care systems work for everyone. Our Nation has made strong advances in improving prevention, increasing early intervention, and expanding treatment of mental illnesses. Earlier this year, I established a Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity Task Force, which aims to ensure that coverage for mental health benefits is comparable to coverage for medical and surgical care, improve understanding of the requirements of the law, and expand compliance with it. Mental health should be treated as part of a person's overall health, and we must ensure individuals living with mental health conditions can get the treatment they need. My Administration also continues to invest in science and research through the BRAIN initiative to enhance our understanding of the complexities of the human brain and to make it easier to diagnose and treat mental health disorders early. One of our most profound obligations as a Nation is to support the men and women in uniform who return home and continue fighting battles against mental illness. Last year, I signed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which fills critical gaps in serving veterans with post-traumatic stress and other illnesses, increases peer support and outreach, and recruits more talented individuals to work on mental health issues at the Department of Veterans Affairs. This law will make it easier for veterans to get the care they need when they need it. All Americans, including service members, can get immediate assistance by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling 1-800-662-HELP. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we recognize those Americans who live with mental illness and substance use disorders, and we pledge solidarity with their families who need our support as well. Let us strive to ensure people living with mental health conditions know that they are not alone, that hope exists, and that the possibility of healing and thriving is real. Together, we can help everyone get the support they need to recover as they continue along the journey to get well. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2016 as National Mental Health Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise mental health awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.  
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Stainboy

Living In The Past

8 posts in this topic

Posted

I'm obsessed with the past, I hate now, I've pretty much given up on the present day and would give anything to go back to a few years ago. This time 3 years ago is my favourite time but I'd take some others. I've even nostalgic for 3 and a half yeaars ago when I was suffering from anxiety that time and acting a bit mad with drinking and that because at least I had some things I liked. I hate everything now and I really hate any signs that time is moving on, I just want to go back.

I know that I need to like now but I don' t know how and I need to stop torturing myself by looking up things from the past or thinking about something. Everything's a reminder though, even seeing a film on TV will remind me that I liked my life a whole lot more the last time that film was on TV.

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Posted

A sad fact of life is we can't go back. Past mistakes/past triumphs are over. Looking back is a waste of time and accomplishes nothing. Focus on today and what you can do to return your life to what you want it to be. Good Luck to You! :hearts:

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Posted

We'd all like to turn the clock back to better times. However, the past is over and we cannot change it or relive it. That's the harsh reality of it. The only thing we can do is live for today and today only. If it's not up to our liking, then we have to delve into ourself to seek the answer to make each day better. It's hard to see positive or daylight when we're depressed. Some of us can pull ourselves out of the gloom and others need help to do so.

I'd like to be 19 again as that was the best year of my life that I've ever had. It's been 40 years, so I can only recall it with frond memories and not wish I could relive 19 over. There's been ups and downs over the years, yet I keep going on hoping that tomorrow will be a better day.

If you need help to get out of the way you feel, it is always available for the asking.

Try to stop thinking about the past and start moving forward with your life. Just take baby steps and you can get there.

Sheepwoman :hearts:

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Posted

Wow I do this too :blink:

Given it a bit of thought over the years and come to the conclusion that it's just a fear of change. Even if I was living back a few years ago I'd probably long for more previous times and so on. I've found that having things which represent the past near me helps. But I try to incorporate them into the now, so that then I may embrace the present in a positive way. When you're in that state of longing ask yourself "What do I want from that time that is lacking in me today". The answer isn't always obvious.

There's a romanticism in the past, this mystique if you can call it that. It's somewhere between reality (now) and memory (past). When you're remembering something, even if it's what you did 10 mins ago your mind is in a nice dream like state. You know you're thinking about it, but somehow it's still mysterious. We tend to crave mystery cause it lends itself to possibility. For example often the build up to an event can be more exciting than the actual event. Our perception of how it will be is quite special to us. Human memory is very good, but our recall is pretty hopeless. Maybe this is why remembering the past is so addictive, it's kinda shrouded in mystique thanks to our dodgy recall.

I find having things around me which represent the past subdues the longing. I have access to those memories through sentimental things and let it kinda permeate the now. It is possible to draw from the past without actually living in it. So I ask myself what am I lacking now that I had then - and work out how to achieve it. Usually it's going back to 'possibilities' - growing up and the 'becoming' phase of life. To solve that I give myself a project, to help feed the want of the 'becoming' phase. I lean towards that this can only be a positive thing because you're constantly learning.

Sheesh, I totally went off on a rant there, hope it makes sense. :hearts:

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Posted

I used to do this alot. Thinking about past choices I have made and how I would have changed them so I wouldn't be in the situation, or suffering from depression, the way I am now. But no matter how much I think about it, I know I can not change it. Whats done is done.

So for the here and now, I make daily goals, things I can do to improve my situation TODAY. When I accomplish those small goals I feel better about things. Then I can move onto other goals, things I would like to accomplish in the next month or so. These may take some harder work and dedication, so sometimes I tend to slack off on them a little more. (something I need to work on).

I guess my point is, you can not change what is done, focus on the things you CAN change today. Something as simple as doing a load of laundry, or vacuuming your floors. Give yourself that little push, and the bigger things will get easier in time.

Thinking of you and am looking forward to FUTURE posts from you.

Looking Up :hearts:

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Posted

I think a lot about the past as well, wishing i could go back or sometimes obsessing about something i did wrong, but i guess it's best to focus on the here and now since you cant change the past or go back

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Posted

Hi Stainboy,

I used to think that way too. I can remember a time when I was surrounded by friends and unburdened by responsibilities. I think we all have a pre-depression state we'd like to return to, but we have to accept that we can't do that. We have to believe that there's a post-depression state that will be just as sweet. I try to keep myself busy with present-day concerns and goals. Some of those are for my recovery and others are career-related or hobby-related. Try to keep busy as much as possible. There are happier times ahead for you - don't give up hope.

Take care.

- Elly

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Posted

oh believe me, i know how it sucks to be stuck in the past.

i was repeatedly molested by a boy throughout elementary school, almost raped by that same boy in high school molested by my grandfather when i was 15 then & suffered horrible abuse in 2 relationships when i was 19, ending up pregnant at the end of the 2nd one. the abuse continued after the baby was born while he was trying to make me get back together with him so that we could "be a family". i repeatedly told him it was over forever and was beaten & raped every time. during one visit i was beaten & raped for saying that i'd never be with him again even if he was the last man on earth. to this day if my current bf comes up behind me i'll get startled. he tries so hard to be gentle with me & show me that love isn't supposed to "hurt".

i'm almost 30 now & am still having issues with the memories of those abusive relationships.

i try to focus on the good things i've got goin' for me now & sometimes it helps.

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