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Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD)


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#1 Lindsay

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 08:55 PM

PMDD

PMS has become a household word and the brunt of many jokes. According to a recent survey, many women remain unaware of its more severe form, premenstrual dysphoric disorder or PMDD. Among 500 women recently surveyed, 8 out of 10 did not know that severe premenstrual problems have been officially classified as PMDD, nor did they know that such problems can be diagnosed and treated. Even more disturbing is that the one in 4 respondents who described their premenstrual symptoms as strong or severe were among those unaware of PMDD.

śWe™ve got to educate women that they do not have to tolerate debilitating premenstrual symptoms,? said Phyllis Greenberger, MSW, Executive Director of the Society for Women™s Health Research, which commissioned the Yankelovich Partners survey (sponsored by a grant from Eli Lilly, manufacturers of Prozac). śWomen have a right to know if what they are experiencing month to month is actually PMDD, and how to get help.?

What is PMDD?
PMDD stands for Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder. It is the acronym for the more severe form of PMS (Premenstrual Syndrome). Like PMS, PMDD occurs the week before the onset of menstruation and disappears a few days after. PMDD is characterized by severe monthly mood swings and physical symptoms that interfere with everyday life, especially a woman™s relationships with her family and friends. PMDD symptoms go far beyond what are considered manageable or normal premenstrual symptoms.

PMDD is a combination of symptoms that may include irritability, depressed mood, anxiety, sleep disturbance, difficulty concentrating, angry outbursts, breast tenderness and bloating. The diagnostic criteria emphasize symptoms of depressed mood, anxiety, mood swings or irritability. The condition affects up to one in 20 American women who have regular menstrual periods.

What is the Difference Between PMS and PMDD?
The physical symptom list is identical for PMS and PMDD; while the emotional symptoms are similar, they are significantly more serious with PMDD. In PMDD, the criteria focus on the mood rather than the physical symptoms. With PMS, sadness or mild depression is not uncommon. With PMDD, however, significant depression and hopelessness may occur; in extreme cases, women may feel like ******* themselves or others. Attributing suicidal or homicidal feelings to śit™s just PMS? is inappropriate; these feelings must be taken as seriously as they are in anyone else and should be promptly brought to the attention of mental health professionals.

Women who have a history of depression are at increased risk for PMDD. Similarly, women who have had PMDD are at increased risk for depression after menopause. In simplest terms, the difference between PMS and PMDD can be likened to the difference between a mild headache and a migraine.

While nearly all of the women in the survey reported experiencing premenstrual symptoms in the last 12 months, nearly half (45 percent) have never discussed PMS with their doctors. Even among women with strong or severe symptoms, more than one out of four (27 percent) had never talked with their doctors about PMS, despite the fact that most in this group reported that the symptoms interfere with their daily activities.

When asked about their reluctance to seek medical treatment even if they thought they had PMDD, nine of every 10 respondents who would not seek treatment said that they could cope with their problems on their own, and about one of every four felt their doctors would not take their complaints seriously if they did bring it up.

PMDD has recently been listed as an official psychiatric diagnosis. The fear of this stigma may contribute to women™s reluctance to discuss it with their doctors. śI frequently work with patients who have waited years to ask a doctor about premenstrual problems or have been turned away by their health care provider when they tried to discuss symptoms,? said Jean Endicott, Ph.D., Director of the Premenstrual Evaluation Unit at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. śThey fear becoming the target of jokes or that seeking help is a sign of weakness. Informing women and providers about diagnosing and treating PMDD helps clear the way to effective medical care.?

Survey respondents reporting strong or severe symptoms revealed the classic PMDD features of impaired social functioning and predominant mood symptoms. Two out of three women (67 percent) with moderate, strong or severe symptoms reported interference with their daily activities. One third of these women said they find their mood changes, not their physical symptoms, to be most bothersome.

The survey also found that women with strong or severe premenstrual symptoms were five times as likely as those with moderate symptoms (26 percent vs. 5 percent) to experience these symptoms every month. A key part of the PMDD diagnosis is determining whether symptoms have occurred during most cycles of the past year and are clearly documented for at least two consecutive menstrual cycles.

When asked what they would do if they thought they had PMDD, two out of three women (66 percent) in the survey said they would most likely get information from their obstetrician or gynecologist, as opposed to consulting friends or using Internet resources. This is encouraging, according to Dr. Endicott, because the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) issued treatment guidelines for premenstrual symptoms earlier this year. It recommended the newer form of anti-depressant medications called śSSRIs? (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) as the preferred method for treating symptoms associated with PMDD.

*************************************************

PMDD
(continued)

Diagnosis:

How do you know if you really have PMS or PMDD? If you think you may, start keeping a PMS Symptom Diary. List the dates of your period, and which symptoms you have (and their severity) on the 10 days preceding, as well as following, your period. After tracking your symptoms for at least 2 cycles, bring this diary with you to consult your physician, along with a list of all medications you are taking (including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, herbs, vitamins, and supplements). Your doctor will give you a complete history and physical exam to rule out other possibilities (such as hypothyroidism, hypoglycemia or depression); no specific physical findings or tests can confirm the diagnosis of PMS.

If you think you have PMS or PMDD, take Dr. Donnica™s Decisionnaire™. Check off all the points that apply to you and take this list with you when you consult your physician.

Are you having relationship difficulties with your spouse, family members, or coworkers?
Are you getting enough sleep (do you awake feeling refreshed?)?
Do you get 20 minutes of aerobic exercise 3-4 times per week?
Do you drink alcoholic beverages?
Is your diet high in red meat, salty foods or sugar?
Do you have mood swings or crying jags in the 10 days before your period?
Do you actually gain weight the few days before your period (that goes away when you™ve finished)?
__ Are you on birth control pills?

Treatment of PMDD:
For general PMS relief, your doctor may recommend birth control pills or switching to another pill if you already take one. Other prescription medical interventions will depend upon the types of symptoms that most affect you. For example, if you are affected by bloating and weight gain, your doctor may prescribe a certain type of diuretic (sprionolactone) to help your body eliminate the excess water. If severe breast tenderness is a major complaint, birth control pills are often recommended. If this is insufficient, your doctor may prescribe a medication called bromocriptine to lower your levels of prolactin (a hormone linked to breast tenderness) or an androgen called Danazol®. For dysmenorrhea (painful periods), prescription prostaglandin inhibitors such as Naprosyn® or Ponstel® can be very effective if over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Motrin® or Advil® were not sufficient.

If you have severe PMS symptoms that interfere with your responsibilities or relationships, or if you tell your physician that you just feel out of control on those days, s/he may suggest that you try one of several prescription medications for PMDD symptoms. The choices are diverse and represent two major classes of anti-depressant medications: the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI™s) and the tricyclic antidepressants. The SSRI™s include medicines such as Prozac®, Effexor®, and Zoloft®. They are generally well tolerated, work quickly, and reduce or eliminate disturbing emotional symptoms for many women, often at doses significantly lower than those required to treat depression. A recent study showed that this type of antidepressant medication worked significantly better for the treatment of PMS than the tricyclics, although tricyclics (e.g. Pamelor®, Elavil®) have a role in treating women with severe insomnia or those with combined depression and PMS.

There are many advocates for śnatural? progesterone therapy for PMS. However, to date, multiple controlled clinical trials of progesterone in several dosage forms has failed to show any benefit for the treatment of physical or emotional symptoms of PMS.

In addition to conventional therapies, many women with PMS report that they have been helped by modalities such as biofeedback, relaxation techniques, acupuncture, and massage. My general approach to these types of therapies is that if you find something that works for you -- great. For many patients, simple stress-reduction techniques such as taking long, hot baths or meditation are also helpful.

Dr. Donnica™s Top Ten Tips for PMS Management:
Discuss your situation with your physician. Work together to develop a comprehensive treatment plan. Follow it!
If you smoke, quit.
Practice stress management: many of the symptoms of PMS are unpredictable and emotionally draining. This can be very stressful and can exacerbate your condition.
Regular exercise may reduce your risk of PMS altogether; exercising once you have symptoms (even though you may not feel like it) will reduce the symptoms you experience for that cycle.
Take a daily, non-prescription multi-vitamin; discuss any other supplement needs with your physician.
Be sure to get an adequate daily intake of calcium (1,200 mg/day).
Eat a well balanced diet; don™t skip meals.
Reduce intake of caffeine, alcohol, refined sugar, and salt.
Enlist the support and understanding of friends and loved ones.
Try to get regular, sufficient sleep.
Important Questions to Ask Your Physician if You Think You Have PMS or PMDD:
Should I be taking any dietary supplements?
Are there any other illnesses that could be causing my symptoms?
Should I be evaluated for other conditions such as low blood sugar, under-active thyroid, or depression?
Could this be related to any medications I might be taking (including birth control pills)?
Do I have PMS or PMDD?
Could my symptoms be related to perimenopause?
Am I a candidate for prescription drug therapy for this condition?
What medicines should I be taking to combat PMS?
Can PMDD be Prevented?
Because doctors are not exactly sure what causes PMS or PMDD, there is currently no proven prevention. However, you may be able to alleviate some symptoms by leading a healthier lifestyle or changing other medications.

There is no cure, per se, for PMS other than menopause. As discussed above, there are many strategies for effective management, and many interventions, which may decrease the symptoms significantly. Whatever your choice of therapy, remember that you™re not committed to that choice for life! The other good news about PMS unlike other recurrent conditions is that you won™t have it for life: PMS ends with menopause if it hasn™t already disappeared after age 40 (although many of the symptoms of perimenopause are very similar to having PMS). You and your physician will monitor your progress and your comfort level with your treatment plan. If there are factors that change -- including your level of satisfaction -- discuss this with your physician.

What Men Should Know About PMS and PMDD:
The main thing that men need to know about PMS or PMDD is that jokes about PMS may be hazardous to your health! In all seriousness, PMS is serious and PMDD is very serious. Be supportive and understanding; but most of all, be thankful that you don™t have to go through these symptoms every month.


Created: 11/28/2000 - Donnica Moore, M.D.
Copyright © 2000 DrDonnica.com

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Posted 06 November 2004 - 02:51 PM

PMDD
Definition    Return to top

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a condition marked by severe depression, irritability, and tension before menstruation. These symptoms are more severe than those seen with premenstrual syndrome (PMS).

Causes, incidence, and risk factors    Return to top

The causes of PMS and PMDD have not been identified, although social, cultural, biological, and psychological factors all appear to be involved. Researchers estimate that PMDD affects between 3% and 8% of women in their reproductive years.

Major depression is very common with PMDD, although PMDD can occur in women who do NOT have a history of major depression.

Studies have found that women who have seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a form of depression characterized by annual episodes of depression during fall or winter that improve in the spring or summer, are likely to also have PMDD.

Symptoms    Return to top

The symptoms of PMDD are similar to those of PMS, but they are generally more severe and debilitating. Symptoms occur during the last week of most menstrual cycles and usually improve within a few days after the period starts.

Five or more of the following symptoms must be present:

Feeling of sadness or hopelessness, possible suicidal thoughts
Feelings of tension or anxiety
Panic attacks
Mood swings marked by periods of teariness
Persistent irritability or anger that affects other people
Disinterest in daily activities and relationships
Trouble concentrating
Fatigue or low energy
Food cravings or binge eating
Sleep disturbances
Feeling out of control
Physical symptoms, such as bloating, breast tenderness, headaches, and joint or muscle pain
Signs and tests    Return to top

There are no physical examination findings or lab tests specific to the diagnosis of PMDD. A complete history, physical examination (including a pelvic exam), and psychiatric evaluation should be conducted to rule out other potential conditions.

Keeping a calendar or diary of symptoms can help women identify the most troublesome symptoms and the times they are likely to occur. This information may help the health care provider diagnose PMDD and determine the appropriate treatment.

Treatment    Return to top

Women with PMDD may be helped by the following:

Regular exercise 3 to 5 times per week
Adequate rest
A balanced diet (with increased whole grains, vegetables, fruit, and decreased or no salt, sugar, alcohol, and caffeine)
In addition, it is important to keep a diary or calendar to record the type, severity, and duration of symptoms.

Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are antidepressant drugs that can treat PMDD. SSRIs include fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), sertraline (Zoloft), paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), and citalopram (Celexa).

SSRIs can relieve physical symptoms, irritability, and tension. In fact, SSRIs appear to relieve PMS-related depression much faster than major depression. Women with PMDD, but without major depression, need only take SSRIs during the 14-day premenstrual period. This approach, called intermittent treatment, causes fewer side effects than when SSRIs are used to treat major depression.

Nutritional supplements -- such as vitamin B6, calcium, and magnesium -- may be recommended. Pain relievers such as aspirin or ibuprofen may be prescribed for headache, backache, menstrual cramping and breast tenderness. Diuretics may be useful for women who experience significant weight gain due to fluid retention.

Expectations (prognosis)    Return to top

After proper diagnosis and treatment, most women with PMDD find that their symptoms go away or drop to tolerable levels.

Complications    Return to top

PMDD symptoms may become severe enough that they interfere with a woman's daily life. Women with depression may have worse symptoms during the second half of their cycle and may require medication adjustments.

As many as 10% of women who report PMS symptoms, particularly those with PMDD, have had suicidal thoughts. The incidence of suicide in women with depression is significantly higher during the latter half of the menstrual cycle.

PMDD may be associated with eating disorders and smoking.

Calling your health care provider    Return to top

Call 911 immediately if you are having suicidal thoughts.

Call for an appointment with your health care provider if:

PMS symptoms do not improve with self-treatment
PMS symptoms are interfering with your daily life


Update Date: 4/8/2003

Updated by: A.D.A.M. editorial.



A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is the first of its kind, requiring compliance with 53 standards of quality and accountability, verified by independent audit. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial process. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics (www.hiethics.com) and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).

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#3 Marie

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Posted 20 October 2006 - 12:47 PM

Oh it is so wonderful to finally find a forum for this disorder. I have PMDD. I really did'nt know what it was and did not know it had a name but I knew I had a problem and that this was just not normal. I was aware enough to firgure out it was related some how the my monthly period. It really became a source of concern when my daughter was born. I noticed that when that time of the month came around I would get so angry so easy. I found myself wishing my daughter was some where else. I did not and could not deal with the daily chores of taking care of her. It always seemed to hit during the 2 week before my period and then I felt much better after my period. But, lordy the guilt I would feel. So I told my ob-gyn what was going on and I had kept records of my behavior and how I felt, the depression and I would just go in complete isolation from everyone during that time. He said that I had PMDD Premenstral Dysphoric Disorder. I was giving a choice of and everyday med or just at that time. I chose the everyday med Zoloft (50 mg) and what a differece I have been taking it for almost a year now. I still have episodes but I am more aware of what is happening now. I am of sounder mind set to understard what going on with my body. I am going to talk to my doctor and see if we can increase the meds a little bit. And hopefully that will take care of it all. I will keep you informed on what happens to me.

I hope to find others on this forum that can identify with me and be able to discuss this disorder with me, just having some one to talk to about it helps so much. If you have not suffered with it there is just truely no understanding..... not like some one who can totally feel what you have felt.

Thanks for listiening. IT really means a lot to have a place to go and just express how you feel.

Edited by Marie, 20 October 2006 - 12:53 PM.


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Posted 11 May 2009 - 07:59 AM

A new study published this month suggests that the duration of treatment for a severe form of premenstrual syndrome called premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is important for determining whether a person will relapse or not. The researchers also found that symptom severity at the onset of treatment is a good predictor of relapse.


According to the researchers, approximately half of the patients who demonstrated improvement experienced relapse within 6 to 8 months after discontinuing treatment with the antidepressant drug, sertraline (Zoloft).


Overall, longer treatment was marginally better in preventing relapse.


But both the rate of relapse and time to relapse were highly associated with symptom severity at baseline. Patients with severe symptoms at baseline were significantly more likely to experience relapse after discontinuing the drug. These patients also experienced relapse after a shorter period, and were significantly more likely to experience relapse during extended drug treatment compared with patients in the lower symptom severity group.


Patients with lower symptom severity at baseline were less likely to experience relapse regardless of treatment duration, and the time to relapse was significantly longer.


According to the researchers, premenstrual syndrome (PMS) continues to be one of the most common health problems reported by women of reproductive age. The morbidity of PMS is due to the severity of the symptoms, the resulting impairment of work, personal relationships, and activities, and its chronic nature over many years of menstrual cycling.


Treatment of the severe form of PMS, termed premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), with serotonergic reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has consistently demonstrated efficacy, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sertraline hydrochloride, fluoxetine hydrochloride, and paroxetine hydrochloride for this indication.


“There is little information about the optimal duration of treatment,” noted the researchers, although anecdotal reports and small pilot investigations suggest that premenstrual symptoms return rapidly in the absence of effective medication.”


The study was conducted on 174 women with PMS or PMDD and was led by Ellen W. Freeman at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.


The women were randomly divided in two groups. Eighty-seven of them received short-term treatment by taking sertraline (Zoloft) for four months and then switching to placebo for fourteen months. The second group of eighty seven participants received long-term treatment of sertraline (Zoloft) for twelve months and placebo for six months. Neither the women nor the researchers had knowledge of the treatment assignments.


Following treatment, results showed that 72 percent presented improvement during the first four months.


After short-term treatment, 60 percent of women showed deterioration with an average midpoint time of four months.


After long-term treatment, 41 percent of women experienced relapse with an average midpoint time of eight months.


“Patients with severe symptoms at baseline were more likely to experience relapse compared with patients in the lower symptom severity group and were more likely to experience relapse with short-term treatment.”


“How long medication should be continued after achieving a satisfactory response and the risk of relapse after discontinuing treatment are important concerns for women and clinicians,” noted the researchers, “given the possible adverse effects and cost of drugs vs. the benefit of medication that improves symptoms, functioning and quality of life.”


“These findings suggest that the severity of symptoms at baseline and symptom remission with treatment should be considered in determining the duration of treatment.”


The study appears in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry (one of the JAMA/Archives journals).


Source: Archives of General Psychiatry[/quote]

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#5 Lindsay

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 03:36 PM

About half of women whose symptoms of severe premenstrual syndrome are relieved by the antidepressant sertraline (Zoloft) appear to experience relapse within six to eight months after stopping medication.


The finding is reported in the May issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Women with more severe symptoms and those who took the drug for a shorter period of time may be more likely to relapse.


Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is one of the most common health problems reported by women of reproductive age, according to background information in the article. Several antidepressant medications, including sertraline hydrochloride, have been approved to treat the most severe form of PMS (known as premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or PMDD).


“There is little information about the optimal duration of treatment, although anecdotal reports and small pilot investigations suggest that premenstrual symptoms return rapidly in the absence of effective medication,” the authors write.


Ellen W. Freeman, Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, conducted an 18-month study involving 174 women with PMS or PMDD. Participants were randomly assigned to either a short-term or long-term treatment group; neither the women nor the researchers knew the treatment assignments.


The 87 women assigned to short-term treatment took sertraline for four months and then were switched to placebo for 14 months, while the 87 assigned to long-term treatment took sertraline for 12 months and placebo for six months.


A total of 125 of the 174 patients (72 percent) showed improvement following treatment, most within the first four months. Relapse—defined as a return to the level of symptoms experienced before treatment—occurred in 41 percent of women after long-term treatment (median or midpoint time to relapse, eight months) and 60 percent of women after short-term treatment (median time to relapse, four months).


“Patients with severe symptoms at baseline were more likely to experience relapse compared with patients in the lower symptom severity group and were more likely to experience relapse with short-term treatment,” the authors write.


“Duration of treatment did not affect relapse in patients in the lower symptom severity group.”


The 41 patients (24 percent) who experienced remission, or a reduction of premenstrual symptoms to the normal post-menstrual level, after four months of treatment were least likely to experience relapse.


“How long medication should be continued after achieving a satisfactory response and the risk of relapse after discontinuing treatment are important concerns for women and clinicians, given the possible adverse effects and cost of drugs vs. the benefit of medication that improves symptoms, functioning and quality of life,” the authors write.


“These findings suggest that the severity of symptoms at baseline and symptom remission with treatment should be considered in determining the duration of treatment.”


Source: JAMA and Archives Journals


Be Well....

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"Lasting effect" is a self -contradictory term.  Meaning does not exist in the future, nor do I.  
Nothing will have meaning, "ultimately."
Nothing will even mean tomorrow what it did today.  Meaning changes with the context.  
My meaningfulness is in the here and now. It is enough that I may be of value to someone today.
It is enough that I make a difference now."  ~Lindsay    
    

  
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#6 littledaisy8

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 07:24 PM

thank you for all this information. i was recently prescribed 50mg of zoloft to take the week before and week during my menstrual cycle. i couldn't handle the side effects from 50mg so i am now taking 25mg and it's better. does you have any experience with withdrawals when only taking 2 weeks out of the month? I would appreciate any feedback.
thanks
all in all it was a very nice day...you could taste heaven perfectly..

#7 music81

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 09:43 AM

i understand what you're feeling..i've always been aware of having bad PMS for yrs...but presumed that every woman suffered the same symptoms and just had to put up with it...after i suffered depression I noticed that my PMS was worse after coming off meds....my attendance at work was poor at this time of month and decided i needed to sort this out....so i went to the doc...and I have been put on an AD....i take it 2 weeks before period...seems to lessen the symptoms....but its meant to take a few months to completely work?

hope you get the right level of meds for you and feel better all the time......i know it can feel like being jekyll and hyde!



[quote name='Marie' date='Oct 20 2006, 05:47 PM' post='160087']
Oh it is so wonderful to finally find a forum for this disorder. I have PMDD. I really did'nt know what it was and did not know it had a name but I knew I had a problem and that this was just not normal. I was aware enough to firgure out it was related some how the my monthly period. It really became a source of concern when my daughter was born. I noticed that when that time of the month came around I would get so angry so easy. I found myself wishing my daughter was some where else. I did not and could not deal with the daily chores of taking care of her. It always seemed to hit during the 2 week before my period and then I felt much better after my period. But, lordy the guilt I would feel. So I told my ob-gyn what was going on and I had kept records of my behavior and how I felt, the depression and I would just go in complete isolation from everyone during that time. He said that I had PMDD Premenstral Dysphoric Disorder. I was giving a choice of and everyday med or just at that time. I chose the everyday med Zoloft (50 mg) and what a differece I have been taking it for almost a year now. I still have episodes but I am more aware of what is happening now. I am of sounder mind set to understard what going on with my body. I am going to talk to my doctor and see if we can increase the meds a little bit. And hopefully that will take care of it all. I will keep you informed on what happens to me.

I hope to find others on this forum that can identify with me and be able to discuss this disorder with me, just having some one to talk to about it helps so much. If you have not suffered with it there is just truely no understanding..... not like some one who can totally feel what you have felt.

Thanks for listiening. IT really means a lot to have a place to go and just express how you feel.
[/quot

#8 scarletquill

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 01:36 PM

It was quite a relief to finally be able to put a name to what I had been suffering since I started my periods at 11. I always just thought that all women felt *this* bad! How wrong was I! Basically I'm only truly depressed for half the month!
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#9 eee123

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 07:13 AM

I'm 32 y. I just accepte I got PMDD.
I guess I've suffered since I got my first period at 15y.

SInce about a year I'm on anti-depressiv (SSRI) medication when my depression got way way to deep...

I'm just so tired of stil falling down in depression - not as bad as before - but do get depressive up til my period each month, even if I am on medication. I'm stil staying home from work, almost each month, not one week as before - but at least 2 days... It's not acceptable.

My medication takes the wurth "sadnes" away - but I get careless and only stay in bed in my sleepy-depressed mood.

Any one got advise?
Should i try another medication?
Do i just have to accept it?

Thanks for advice!

#10 marzipan

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 07:35 PM

I think I have this, just before I'm due on (I am on the combined pill) I feel depressed, even suicidal. I get heart palpitations too. My stomach boats and I gain weight, I get angry over pointless things and find myself in tears over nothing. It's very stressful, and makes me ill, I find I stay in the house when this happens. It greatly impacts on ny relationships with people and I feel stupid and embarrassed. Does anyone know if you can get help for this in England?

Edited by marzipan, 09 August 2011 - 07:36 PM.


#11 Bflyxs

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 04:11 PM

Im a sufferer of PMDD since about 16. Im now 24 and still suffer from it monthly. Ive been on the pill and although it helped somewhat, the cons outweighed the pros. I lost my sex drive, I was irritable, and gained weight. Since off it (two months now) my pmdd has been out of control. I assume its because my hormones are adjusting but this month is by far the worst. Its affecting my fiances and i's relationship and today I feel purely SICK. Im already on zoloft and unfortunately thats no additional help. I have an rx for Ativan that I take in severe cases of anxiety and have just now taken one in hopes it'll help how Im feeling.


Does anyone have any input on the use of anti-anxiety pills to help pmdd?

#12 Trace

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 05:13 AM

Hi Bflyxs

Here is a link to a topic that may be helpful:

http://www.depressio...__1#entry812852

Trace
Listen in deep silence. Be very still and open your mind.... Sink deep into the peace that waits for you beyond the frantic, riotous thoughts and sights and sounds of this insane world. - A course of miracles.

True beauty must come, must be grown, from within.... - Ralph W Trine.



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#13 Kimber2007

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 08:10 AM

I'm 42 and have pmdd...the older I get the worse it has gotten. I can be "superwoman" three weeks out of the month and do it all, but the week before my period starts I become less patient, moody, over all just really hard to live with...I don't even want to be around myself. I recognize I'm being like this but seem to have no control over it. I've also noticed that if I drink alcoholic beverages this week it has a totally different effect on me vs the other three weeks of the month, seems to hit me harder and faster.

So long story short, my doc prescribed 20mg/daily of prozac..started 5 days ago- I have some concerns/questions if anyone has experienced this or can help.

1. Day two into taking it I started my menstrual cycle (10 days early) cramps, bloating, back pain- has continued for three days, normally I only experience the heavy effects of my cycle on the second day-- :stare: and my cycle usually only lasts 5 days

2. So far I'm not feeling better...I'm tired (sleeping way to much) :yawn: and have no motivation and feel numb....I'm not moody because I feel like I don't give a **it -about anything....I'm busy..work, kids....like everyone-- I don't have time to be tired- I'm hoping this will wear off because I like being active :EmoticonDogRun:

3. I'm hungry and have craving like right before you start your cycle-- :verysad3:

I'm hoping if I stick with the meds it will get better but honestly I don't like feeling numb or tired and this period thing is just irritating.. the busier I am usually the happier I am.. and right now I'm feeling very "blue" and frustrated :boredsmiley:

Thanks in advance for your replies..this really is annoying and I'm thinking of stopping and just "coping" with the one crappy week out of the month vs crappy every day.

Kimber

Edited by AquaViolet, 16 March 2012 - 08:37 AM.
TOS


#14 Capthom

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 05:42 PM

Hi Kimber,

I am 47 and have just been diagnosed with PMDD in the last two years. I was getting treatment for depression when my psychologist mentioned PMDD. I'd never heard of it before. I take Celexa and it has made a big difference since I went to a higher dose, 40 mg. It does take a month or more to take effect, so please don't give up on it yet.
I was also diagnosed with breast cancer last year and after a lumpectomy I was given chemo and radiation. This put me into instant menopause and I noticed my PMDD symptoms improved a bit. Then I was put on Tamoxifen and a miracle happened! After about a month my constant "edgy" feeling evaporated and I have been able to feel normal for the first time in my life.
I read somewhere that Tamoxifen has been studied for PMDD, but there are concerns about putting non-cancer patients on a cancer drug. It feels like I've been allegic to my own estrogen since puberty and this estrogen-blocking drug is treating that allergy.
I hope you are doing okay. It is nice to find this forum and talk with others with PMDD.

#15 raspberry735

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 02:32 PM

I too suffer from pmdd and also major depression. I finally got diognosed about a month ago and got on meds(citalopram & trazodone). I finally decided that I just couldn't get better on my own( I've been trying for just about 25 years now). I also got tired of only having about 4 days out of the month be happy ones and the last two weeks being just miserable.
The meds have helped tremendously and the down days are more tolerable
Also for me doing something active each morning wether its walking the dog or going to the gym help me to not get "stuck".
It feels great to come here and get so much info and support from others with the same illness.

#16 Broken Butterfly

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 02:54 AM

Wow! I can't believe there's a sub forum devoted to PMDD!!
Out of all of my dx'es I hate my PMDD the most. I have tried every natural and rx therapy there is. All it's done is made me addicted to benzo's.
Sorry, the one rx I haven't yet tried is Lupron to put me into chemical menopause. I have seen a surgeon to ask about having my ovaries removed to stop the monthly madness, but even though my family is complete, they won't do it.

I can't introduce any hormones to my body or it freaks out. The worst thing about PMDD is that a lot of Psych's  don't understand it or just dismiss it and they'll often say you need to see your Gyno, GP, Endo about it. When you see those professionals, they say it's a psychological condition and you need to see a psych about it!
And other people just don't 'get it'. They compare it to their PMS and think you're being a drama queen. I only have one friend who 'gets it' and can actually see it creeping up.

Since my latest and thorough dx'es with a new psych I was put on Seroquel for my BP2.  It's helped a little bit with the PMDD. I'm not quite as physically and emotionally out of control. (I'm also on Effexor and Valium. Have been on AD's for over a decade which never helped me with the PMDD)

If I had've seen this thread yesterday I would have said it was the first month that I hadn't thought about or actually SI'ed. But the thoughts have been there today on day 28 of my cycle.....no action though.

One thing that has never made sense to me or any medical professional is the really bad cramping I get. I don't have any endometriosis or anything else that often causes severe pain, but this pain is so severe that the only thing that has ever relieved it completely was oxycontin.....which I can't be taking regularly. (it was a one off thing)  Does anypne else get severe cramping along with the mood issues?

The pain makes my mood even worse....and the bloating is ridiculous! I actually have PMDD clothes so people don't ask me when the baby is due .LOL
 


Be kind to yourself. It's hard to be happy when someone's mean to you all the time.

Dx'es: Bipolar, Borderline Personality Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, GAD , PTSD, PMDD.

 

              Currently undergoing medication overhaul to find the right combination

 


#17 BetsyLu

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 01:07 PM

I was put on birth control pretty much right when I started menstruating at 14 to help with cramps. They were unbelievably bad. I stayed on it until February of this year, when I was 21. I had to get off it because apparently taking anything with estrogen when you have migraines with auras is a bad idea as it ups your chances of stroke. Since going off birth control, I have had horrible PMDD. I couldn't understand why I got suicidal once a month! About a week before my period, I get into a deep deep depression and get very irritable and angry. Sometimes I feel suicidal. I haven't found a good way to cope with it, as all of the SSRIs I have tried (and I've tried a lot) make me very ill. 

 

Does anyone have suggestions for natural alternatives? Or even other medications that aren't in the SSRI family that have helped you? I'm very tentative about trying anything new because the SSRIs just make me SO SICK but I also don't want to go through any more months wishing I would die. :(



#18 Animalier

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 10:06 AM

Hi everyone, I have been a pmdd  Sufferer all my life. I finally got help for it at 53 (when my periods are winding down actually) at this point it has turned into regular depression, but I also seem to have extremely bad bouts of anger in combination with depression. I also have Asperger's which also has tantrums and inability to relate to other people as symptoms.

 

Having had no medical intervention, and never having any doctor who brought it up, I have lost several jobs over the years due to this, one after working there for 10 years because a new manager did not know how to deal with me, and have not really gotten into the habit of keeping friends, realizing at some point I will get angry and show this awful side of myself.

 

So, in effect it has affected all aspects of my life. I have really never met a man who would deal with my anger issues, or any other issues, really. I've never had children. I have never done a lot of things that a "real woman" ought to do.

 

I have a combination of depression, PMDD, and Asperger's syndrome.

 

I am now on low level Prozac, and can only work part time because I can't stand to be around people a lot. (I enjoy my job). I can work a day (8 hours) but need a day off between work days. On these days I work as an artist and make things to sell at galleries. So I still work-- and am not trying to "beat the system" or anything.  


Edited by Animalier, 20 August 2013 - 10:09 AM.





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