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Emdr


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#1 djbingham

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 10:30 AM

I was wondering if anyone has had any experience during their therapy sessions with EMDR and if so did it help. Are there any negative and positive feelings out there, if so please explain a little to me. I have recently begun this with my thereapist and am interested to hear from people that actually experienced it and not just read about the technical aspects of it.
Thanks
Deena

#2 flippingout

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 01:40 PM

Hi Deena, I dont have experience with EMDR. I hope it is helpful for you in therapy. Let us know your progress.

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#3 shabur

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 05:23 PM

Can you tell me about it. Both my tdoc and pdoc want me to do it, but from what I have read, its scares the cr** out of me.
I know you are just starting it but I am wondering how you go about it and what happens to you while it is performed.
Thanks
Shabur

Edited by shabur, 26 May 2007 - 08:38 PM.

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#4 MrMisery

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 02:40 AM

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing?

I assume this is what you're talking about. I haven't heard of it too often, which is why I thought I'd double check before giving my opinion.


My therapist recomended I try it a while back. My instinct and every rational thought in me told me that it was a bad idea, what it promised (for me, removing the emotional attatchment to traumatic memories) wasn't necessarily good, and my therapist said that it'd work right away which struck me as a sure sign that it wouldn't work at all.

Nonetheless, my therapist knows psychology better than I do. Which makes him the one person I actually listen to, even if only on psychology. So I decided to go with his judgement.

I spent the first session sitting there thinking about how silly all of this was as he waves his finger in front of my face and I try to concentrate on particular memories. Since then I've not been bothered by those memories. I used to be unable to sleep many nights because of my memories, I couldn't walk down the street either. The next day I felt... fine.

In hindsight, my initial deliberations over whether or not the removal emotional attachments - negative thought they may have been - was actually a good thing. I now try to remember things; right now I'm sitting here thinking of a time when I thought someone was going to **** me, I didn't think I had another twenty seconds to live. I'm not sad, I'm not angry. I'm not bothered by it at all. It happened, and it's in the past. In fact, I can only remember half of each memory, removed is the part influenced by my emotions. For example that memory I just spoke of, the other person looks significantly smaller, more human. I can now also see that it must have been little more than two minutes of actual danger, it used to feel like it had been an eternity.

So, is it a good thing to not have the negative effects of a traumatic memory?
I have no idea. I feel better. But that fear of everything, that was part of me and now it's not there anymore.

My advice is to accept emdr treatment, it sounds silly but I'm living proof that at can work miraculously well and really improve your life. Then again, it may not work at all for everyone else and it's not all good when it does work.

#5 shabur

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 06:56 PM

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing?

I assume this is what you're talking about. I haven't heard of it too often, which is why I thought I'd double check before giving my opinion.


My therapist recomended I try it a while back. My instinct and every rational thought in me told me that it was a bad idea, what it promised (for me, removing the emotional attatchment to traumatic memories) wasn't necessarily good, and my therapist said that it'd work right away which struck me as a sure sign that it wouldn't work at all.

Nonetheless, my therapist knows psychology better than I do. Which makes him the one person I actually listen to, even if only on psychology. So I decided to go with his judgement.

I spent the first session sitting there thinking about how silly all of this was as he waves his finger in front of my face and I try to concentrate on particular memories. Since then I've not been bothered by those memories. I used to be unable to sleep many nights because of my memories, I couldn't walk down the street either. The next day I felt... fine.

In hindsight, my initial deliberations over whether or not the removal emotional attachments - negative thought they may have been - was actually a good thing. I now try to remember things; right now I'm sitting here thinking of a time when I thought someone was going to **** me, I didn't think I had another twenty seconds to live. I'm not sad, I'm not angry. I'm not bothered by it at all. It happened, and it's in the past. In fact, I can only remember half of each memory, removed is the part influenced by my emotions. For example that memory I just spoke of, the other person looks significantly smaller, more human. I can now also see that it must have been little more than two minutes of actual danger, it used to feel like it had been an eternity.
So, is it a good thing to not have the negative effects of a traumatic memory?
I have no idea. I feel better. But that fear of everything, that was part of me and now it's not there anymore.

My advice is to accept emdr treatment, it sounds silly but I'm living proof that at can work miraculously well and really improve your life. Then again, it may not work at all for everyone else and it's not all good when it does work.


Did this take care of all the trauma associated with it or just that specific moment? The trauma I suffered occured over a 9 year period.
How did you feel durin the session while recalling these memories? My one major fear is being overwhelmed by emotion?

Also, what happens now? My past has left me unable to allow myself to trust others, has left me feeling unlovable, .... is that all suppose to go away?

This is probably all too much for you to answer; I know each person has different experiences. If you have any resources you think would be helpful please email them to me. You are the first person I have vome across that has actually done this.

Thanks
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#6 djbingham

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 08:01 PM

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing?

I assume this is what you're talking about. I haven't heard of it too often, which is why I thought I'd double check before giving my opinion.


My therapist recomended I try it a while back. My instinct and every rational thought in me told me that it was a bad idea, what it promised (for me, removing the emotional attatchment to traumatic memories) wasn't necessarily good, and my therapist said that it'd work right away which struck me as a sure sign that it wouldn't work at all.

Nonetheless, my therapist knows psychology better than I do. Which makes him the one person I actually listen to, even if only on psychology. So I decided to go with his judgement.

I spent the first session sitting there thinking about how silly all of this was as he waves his finger in front of my face and I try to concentrate on particular memories. Since then I've not been bothered by those memories. I used to be unable to sleep many nights because of my memories, I couldn't walk down the street either. The next day I felt... fine.

In hindsight, my initial deliberations over whether or not the removal emotional attachments - negative thought they may have been - was actually a good thing. I now try to remember things; right now I'm sitting here thinking of a time when I thought someone was going to **** me, I didn't think I had another twenty seconds to live. I'm not sad, I'm not angry. I'm not bothered by it at all. It happened, and it's in the past. In fact, I can only remember half of each memory, removed is the part influenced by my emotions. For example that memory I just spoke of, the other person looks significantly smaller, more human. I can now also see that it must have been little more than two minutes of actual danger, it used to feel like it had been an eternity.

So, is it a good thing to not have the negative effects of a traumatic memory?
I have no idea. I feel better. But that fear of everything, that was part of me and now it's not there anymore.

My advice is to accept emdr treatment, it sounds silly but I'm living proof that at can work miraculously well and really improve your life. Then again, it may not work at all for everyone else and it's not all good when it does work.


Thank you for responding. I have only had one session and I went back to one traumatic memory and the thing was is it would trigger another memory and so on. I found it very helpful because going back to those memories has helped me to see why I do or feel some of the things I do as an adult. I also find myself in this week after going back to more memories that were buried. I think as you said above that this will be very good for me in my healing process by letting go of the past or seeing how the past has affected my future and that I now have control and understanding I can move on and heal.
Deena

#7 djbingham

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 08:03 PM

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing?

I assume this is what you're talking about. I haven't heard of it too often, which is why I thought I'd double check before giving my opinion.


My therapist recomended I try it a while back. My instinct and every rational thought in me told me that it was a bad idea, what it promised (for me, removing the emotional attatchment to traumatic memories) wasn't necessarily good, and my therapist said that it'd work right away which struck me as a sure sign that it wouldn't work at all.

Nonetheless, my therapist knows psychology better than I do. Which makes him the one person I actually listen to, even if only on psychology. So I decided to go with his judgement.

I spent the first session sitting there thinking about how silly all of this was as he waves his finger in front of my face and I try to concentrate on particular memories. Since then I've not been bothered by those memories. I used to be unable to sleep many nights because of my memories, I couldn't walk down the street either. The next day I felt... fine.

In hindsight, my initial deliberations over whether or not the removal emotional attachments - negative thought they may have been - was actually a good thing. I now try to remember things; right now I'm sitting here thinking of a time when I thought someone was going to **** me, I didn't think I had another twenty seconds to live. I'm not sad, I'm not angry. I'm not bothered by it at all. It happened, and it's in the past. In fact, I can only remember half of each memory, removed is the part influenced by my emotions. For example that memory I just spoke of, the other person looks significantly smaller, more human. I can now also see that it must have been little more than two minutes of actual danger, it used to feel like it had been an eternity.
So, is it a good thing to not have the negative effects of a traumatic memory?
I have no idea. I feel better. But that fear of everything, that was part of me and now it's not there anymore.

My advice is to accept emdr treatment, it sounds silly but I'm living proof that at can work miraculously well and really improve your life. Then again, it may not work at all for everyone else and it's not all good when it does work.


Did this take care of all the trauma associated with it or just that specific moment? The trauma I suffered occured over a 9 year period.
How did you feel durin the session while recalling these memories? My one major fear is being overwhelmed by emotion?

Also, what happens now? My past has left me unable to allow myself to trust others, has left me feeling unlovable, .... is that all suppose to go away?

This is probably all too much for you to answer; I know each person has different experiences. If you have any resources you think would be helpful please email them to me. You are the first person I have vome across that has actually done this.

Thanks


See my answer below. Even after one week this has helped me to see how my past has affected my future and now that I know that these past events made me the way I am I can start on the path of healing.

#8 djbingham

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 08:10 PM

Can you tell me about it. Both my tdoc and pdoc want me to do it, but from what I have read, its scares the cr** out of me.
I know you are just starting it but I am wondering how you go about it and what happens to you while it is performed.
Thanks
Shabur


Hi Shabur,
I have only had one session and instead of having me follow her finger my therapist used tapping. At first I was a little nervous, but when we first began we established a safe place I could go to if my memories became to intense. As I said below one memory would trigger another memory and it really helped me to see why I am the way I am as an adult. All during this week after my initial session I have felt more at peace with the child I was and am looking forward to healing more than I had before. I will have a second session on the 6th of June and I can share what happens if you would like. Your more than welcome to email me and see how it went. Considering I have only had one session I am no expert, but it seems to be something that I believe will help me to heal and this is after only one session.
During the session my therapist would have me talk to her about some of what I was feeling, either in words or body language etc. Several memories were happening one after the other and it formed a pattern in a sense. That is all I really have right now but I promise to keep you posted. I will add you to my email list.
Take Care and God Bless
Deena

#9 shabur

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 08:26 PM

Thanks for the info. I think I will look at it again.

I would love to hear how this goes for you. Please email me if you feel up to it. Did you have trouble recalling or focusing on any one memory? I have buried mine pretty deep but do see how it has affected me as an adult. Myu tdoc recently told me that while I am an adult I see myself emotionally as that child who was abused.
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#10 whimpy2

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 12:58 PM

Very few therapist know how to do it correctly, I had to investigate my therapist and ask them a lot of questions, if done wrong it can have very harsh lash back be careful!

#11 Bitterroot

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 11:58 PM

I've been through about 40 EMDR sessions - - they're super intense, but extremely effective for decreasing feelings about trauma or traumatic events. I would recommend seeking out a trained EMDR specialist if you and your mental health care folks feel it would be a good fit for you. I often supplemented my EMDR sessions with biofeedback devices such as hand buzzers, which helped me to "reprocess" some trauma via the hand buzzers activating both sides of my brain. (This stuff is complicated, and should really be explained by a trained professional that uses proper termanology.)

I'm still very depressed, but now painful events from my past don't play a factor in depressive episodes that I currently experience. Which in turn means that my episodes have decreased in length.

EMDR has been extremely beneficial for me, however, I am curious, has anyone had it "wear-off" as the years past by?

#12 julidarlin

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Posted 10 June 2009 - 04:29 PM

Hi Bitterroot,

My tdoc has been treating me with EMDR for several traumas I experienced, and I have to say that it's been life changing. He told me that the treatment doesn't wear off, as it effects the part of your brain that did not properly process the traum(s) at the time. EMDR in conjunction with therapy effectively puts the experience where the memories should have been stored from the beginning. The memories themselves are still there, but it allows you to put them in the past where they belong.

All the best, Juli
"We can never obtain peace in the outer world until we make peace with ourselves." ~Dalai Lama

#13 Tovah

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 04:53 PM

I tried it 3 times. Once it worked, the other two times it did not. But I believe it works for many people.
Donnie Darko: I made a new friend today.
Psychiatrist: Real or imaginary?
Donnie Darko: Imaginary.

#14 coffee_cake

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 11:49 PM

Hey, I was reading through this (and other similar) threads and was wondering if anyone knows about the effectiveness of EMDR on someone without a specific trauma.

I know EMDR was created for PTSD. I don't have PTSD (to my knowledge) and don't have one or a few huge traumas (rape, assault, death, losing a parent, etc). I have experiences over the course of my life that can be defined as a trauma, cumulatively. This is what I'm working on in therapy.

From the research I've done, this has only really succeeded on people who can pinpoint very specific and very hurrendous experiences. I'm worried it won't work on someone with a large pool of small instances that wouldn't necessarily be harmful if on their own. Does that make any sense?

Anyway, any help or insight would be GREATLY appreciated.

coffee_cake

#15 Trace

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 08:02 AM

Hi and Welcome to DF Coffee Cake

If you have suffered a whole pool of smaller trauma's you could ask your therapist about a trauma egg.
What happens with that it you draw an egg and make little bubbles, from the bottom up, in every bubble, you put a trauma in, no matter how small.
These can be filled with trauma's throughout your life. The therapist then works through each trauma one at a time with you, once that is done, A column on either side of the egg is written, one with negative aspects of your life and one with positive ones.
The therapist works them together and the positive and negatives cancel each other out.
It is a very good way of dealing with a lot of small trauma's.

Trace
Listen in deep silence. Be very still and open your mind.... Sink deep into the peace that waits for you beyond the frantic, riotous thoughts and sights and sounds of this insane world. - A course of miracles.

True beauty must come, must be grown, from within.... - Ralph W Trine.



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#16 TheWalk

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 01:33 PM

I am amazed that so many are getting therapy from their Doctor. I like my Doc, but we don't get much time and we discuss meds.

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#17 invisible1

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 02:08 PM

Hey, I was reading through this (and other similar) threads and was wondering if anyone knows about the effectiveness of EMDR on someone without a specific trauma.

I know EMDR was created for PTSD. I don't have PTSD (to my knowledge) and don't have one or a few huge traumas (rape, assault, death, losing a parent, etc). I have experiences over the course of my life that can be defined as a trauma, cumulatively. This is what I'm working on in therapy.

From the research I've done, this has only really succeeded on people who can pinpoint very specific and very hurrendous experiences. I'm worried it won't work on someone with a large pool of small instances that wouldn't necessarily be harmful if on their own. Does that make any sense?

Anyway, any help or insight would be GREATLY appreciated.

coffee_cake


I don't have any stats to quote you about the effectiveness...just my own experience. Much like you, my situation seems to slip between the cracks of what would be considered PTSD or major tauma. I have a lot of the symptoms of PTSD, and I grew up in a life of neglect and emotional abuse...but I don't remember much of my childhood. I'm have major PTSD reactions to anything sexual, but I don't really remember any sexual abuse. With this being the situation, I wasn't sure if EMDR would work for me. Actually, I was hoping the EMDR would help me recover memories of what was really causing my symptoms. In that sense, it didn't really work for me. I didn't really remember anything new, but it did help me to emotionally connect to some things that I did remember, which helped me to process those emotions. I have always been "stuck in my head" and unable to really connect to any emotions. I tend to be numb and detatched most of the time. It seems that the debilitating depression is the only emotion that breaks through the numbness. So, the EMDR wasn't successful in doing what I wanted it to do, but it was actually very helpful in allowing me to feel and work through some of the intense emotions that I had shut off, but that were still affecting my life. I found it to be a very helpful experience, even though I didn't have any "major trauma" to focus on.

#18 cjchicka31

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 05:55 PM

I have GAD, and my p-doc tried EMDR during my first session with her. In my personal experience, it may have scarred me more than the instance I used in the visualization.

I picked a time when I was 13, and overheard some of the 'cool girls' making fun of me behind my back at my post-graduation party. I did exactly what the pdoc told me to do, in each step, and spoke to my 13 year old self in it.

Afterwards though, I was traumatized. I can't explain why it didn't work, or why I reacted so harshly, but I was on suicide watch for 4 days after that appointment. My brothers literally slept on my bedroom floor, because they were terrified that I would do something during the night, because I was 'that' down after the EMDR. It was all I could think about, and seemed to make things plenty worse for me.

I told all of my reaction to my pdoc at my next session, and she told me then that she didn't think it would work because I'm "so young" (at 27), but wanted to give it a try anyways. :shocked:

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so that we can feel temporarily whole for having won their approval -
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Diagnosed with GAD and Social Anxiety in 2005, taking Effexor 300mg





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