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Published By  Lindsay

Many times we think we understand something well, but we may just not have all the facts.

 When it comes to mental illnesses, there is a misunderstanding on what it is, and most importantly what it isn’t. If you are considering treatment for yourself or someone you love, it is crucial to differentiate between fact and fiction. Here’s some help to know the truth:

FICTION: Only “crazy” people get mental health treatment.

FACT: Mental illness can happen to anyone. You are not alone. The National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMH) states that “one in four adults, approximately 61.5 million Americans, experience mental illness in a given year and approximately 20% of youth ages 13 to 18 experience some kind of mental disorder in a given year.”

FICTION: Mental illness is a sign of weakness.

FACT: Mental illness is not caused by personal weakness. It is a disease like any other and cannot be easily cured by positive thinking or willpower. Mental illness is not related to a person’s character or intelligence. It falls along a continuum of severity. Some people require proper treatment.

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Published By  Forum Admin

 

 

 
In a new study, participants who paid attention to their physical and mental feelings showed small but meaningful reductions in anxiety, depression and pain.

By

Rachael Rettner, LiveScience
Tue, Jan 07 2014 at 9:20 AM

 

 
Woman practicing mindfulness meditation on beach

 

Meditation programs may help reduce anxiety, depression and pain in some patients, but may not lead to a boost in positive feelings or overall health, according to a new review study.
 
The review analyzed information from 47 previously published studies with a total of 3,515 participants. Each study included a group that participated in meditation (usually for a few weeks or months), as well as a control group that participated in another activity that required similar time and effort, such as learning about nutrition or performing another type of exercise.
 
Most participants had a mental health condition (such as anxiety or depression) or a physical health condition (such as lower back pain or heart disease.) [Mind Games: 7 Reasons You Should Meditate]
 
Participants who practiced mindfulness meditation for about eight weeks to six months showed small but meaningful reductions in anxiety, depression and pain. Mindfulness meditation is a form of meditation in which people learn to pay attention to what they are feeling physically and mentally from moment to moment.
 
Most of the improvements in pain occurred among participants who had visceral pain (pain in internal organs).
Meditation programs were not more effective than exercise or cognitive-behavioral group therapy at reducing anxiety, depression and pain, the review said.
 
 

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Published By  Lindsay
 
 

Perfectionism, Procrastination, and Distress

 
 
 
 

 

Learn to outwit the devil on your shoulder and get things done, with advice from procrastination expert Timothy Pychyl, Ph.D.

 

A study that examines traits that predict psychological distress
 
Psychological Distress
 
Excessive concerns about making mistakes, pernicious self-doubt, harsh self-criticism, impossibly high standards or expectations for performance, a strong and chronic tendency to evaluate one’s performance as not measuring up to levels expected by oneself or others - these are features of maladaptive perfectionism that predict psychological distress.

In a longitudinal study across the semester of a sample of predominantly female undergraduate students, Kenneth Rice, Clarissa Richardson, and Dustin Clark from the University of Florida examined the relations between measures of perfectionism, procrastination, and psychological distress. They explored a number of different potential models that might explain the relation among these variables, with a particular emphasis on a model where perfectionism leads to more procrastination that increases psychological distress. Interestingly, this isn’t what they found. Before I tell you what they did find, let me explain a little more about perfectionism and its possible relation to procrastination.

Published By  Lindsay

 

 

 

 

January 1 became the first day of the year in 46 B.C. when Julius Caesar developed a new calendar, switching from a lunar one to a solar one. He named the first month of the Julian calendar after the two-faced god Janus. Janus could look back on the past year and look forward to the year ahead at the same time. The Romans exchanged New Year’s gifts that symbolized good fortune, such as branches from sacred trees and, later, coins imprinted with the likeness of Janus.

Although the date for the start of the New Year is not the same in every culture, the day is a time for making promises and for setting goals for the year ahead. According to the Journal of Clinical Psychology, about half of our population here in the United States makes resolutions each year. Popular New Year’s resolutions for Americans are: losing weight, exercising and giving up smoking.

The approach of a new year is also a good time to set some business resolutions. Think of 2014 as the year you can attain some new heights in your career. Here are six areas to examine. The specifics are up to you.

Here are 6 New Year’s Resolutions:

 

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Published By  Lindsay
Coping with your less-than-ideal family during the season of thanks and joy
 
 
 
 
 
It’s not even Thanksgiving, but Christmas is everywhere in New York City, as it has been since the day after Halloween.  I no longer dread the holidays the way I once did but the idealized image —of that big, happy, smiling family—still eludes me, as it did during my childhood and later.  For unloved daughters and sons, the stress of the holidays sweeps in much more than the nuisance of crowded stores, piped-in joys, worries about money or pleasing everyone with the right gift.

For many, it will conjure up—almost as if fresh and new—the pain, exclusion, and loss they felt in their families of origin. For women who continue to interact with their unloving mothers—for whatever reason—the holidays can throw all the stresses and pains of past and present into high relief. For those who have made the difficult and painful decision of going “no contact,” the holidays sometimes evoke a renewed sense of self-doubt about the decision made, along with a feeling of isolation.  The weight of cultural disapproval may feel heavier at this time of year.

 

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Published By  Forum Admin

 

Posted: 09/11/2013 8:14 am
 
 
I've always been interested in the wisdom of our elders and often do a practice with students and clients when they've seemed to veer off the path of what truly matters in their lives. I ask them to project themselves forward many years from now looking back onto this very moment right now, what do they wish they would've done? Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent many years working in palliative care caring for those who were dying. She eventually published a book called the The Top Five Regrets of the Dying

Regrets can be seen as something that's good if they give us insight into what we can change today for the better. Here are the top five. Use them as a north star to help guide your actions in the days that follow toward an even more fulfilling life. Although we can veer off the path, when we notice the star, we can always come back to it.

 

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