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       Our mission is to create an atmosphere that is both supportive and informative in a caring, safe environment for our members to talk to their peers about depression, anxiety, mood disorders, medications, therapy and recovery.


Our vision is to advance the public awareness of mental health issues so as to eliminate the stigma that surrounds depression and mood disorders through education and advocacy, as well as striving to obtain quality medical care for mental health patients, as it is no different from any other medical illness.

 

 
 
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Latest News

Managing Holiday Stress

 

 

Coping with Depression

Holidays are supposed to be a time of joy and celebration, but for many people they are anything but. Learn about statistics and how to cope.

Written by Michael Kerr
Medically Reviewed by George Krucik, MD

 
Holidays are supposed to be a time of joy and celebration, but for many people they are anything but.

Depression may occur at any time of the year, but the stress and anxiety of the holiday season—especially during the months of November and December (and, to a lesser extent, just before Valentine's Day)—may cause even those who are usually content to experience loneliness and a lack of fulfillment.

Part of the problem, according to Adam K. Anderson, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, is the bombardment of media during the holidays showing images of smiling families and friends.

"[People] may start to question the quality of their own relationships," he says. 

According to one 1999 Canadian study of patients treated by emergency psychiatric services during the Christmas season, the most common stressors were feelings of loneliness and "being without a family."

Facts & Statistics: The Truth About the Holiday Suicide Myth

The myth has been repeated so many times, most people consider it common knowledge: more people commit suicide between Thanksgiving and Christmas than at any other time of the year. Although it sounds reasonable, it simply isn't true.

Contrary to popular belief, December actually has the fewest suicide attempts of any month of the year. The facts, while seemingly encouraging, may be more complicated, however.

While it's true that suicide attempts tend to drop off just before and during the holidays, there is a significant uptick in suicide rates following Christmas—a 40 percent uptick, according to one large Danish study. Christmas itself seems to have a protective effect with regard to certain types of psychopathology, say researchers, but there is a significant rebound effect immediately following the holiday.

Although fewer people utilize emergency services or attempt suicide during December, there is an increase in certain other kinds of psychopathology, including mood disorders such as dysphoria and substance abuse.

Social Isolation



Published By Lindsay, 2014-11-12 15:29:27 Read More...
Psychotherapy

Why Won’t You Take Your Medication?

 


by Pete Earley


“Why won’t you just take your medication? I take pills for my cholesterol every night and its no big deal?”

“Every psychiatrist we’ve seen has said you have a mental illness. Why won’t you accept it? Why would the doctors tell you that you’re sick, if it weren’t true?”

“Let’s look at when you were doing well and when you got into trouble. What was the difference? Medication. It was the difference. When you were on your meds, you were fine. And when you weren’t, you got into trouble. Can’t you see that?”

These quotes may sound familiar to you if you are a parent and have a a son or daughter with a severe mental illness. I’ve said everyone of them to my son, Mike.


It often is frustrating for us – parents — to understand why our children will not take anti-psychotic  medication or take it only until they get better and then stop. The remedy seems so clear-cut to us, so simple - and watching them experience the mania, depression, and delusions that happen when they become psychotic is heartbreaking and horrific.

Early on, I tried every trick out there to get Mike to take his pills. Those of you who have read my book know that during one of his first breakdowns, I crushed his pills and mixed them into his breakfast cereal only to be caught by him. I snuck into his room and counted his pills too one day and when I discovered that he had stopped taking them, I followed the advice of a therapist who had told me that I needed to practice “tough love.” I told Mike that if he didn’t take his medication, he had to move out of my house. He did – that very same day.

Another time, I offered to pay him to take his medication — a $1 per pill.


Xavier Amador
It was my friend, Xavier Amador, author of the book, “I’m Not Sick, I Don’t Need Help” who finally convinced me to back off. “I can promise you, Pete,” he said, “your son knows exactly how you feel about medication. You don’t need to ever mention it to him again.”

And since that day, I haven’t. Not a word.

So why do persons with mental illnesses refuse to take their medication or stop taking them as soon as they become stable?

I am asked that question more than any other after I give a speech.

Let’s skip the obvious reasons –that some anti-psychotic medications can dull a person, make them feel physically lousy, kill their sex drive, cause them to gain weight or send them to bed exhausted even though they are already sleeping for 16 hours a day. Let’s ignore the fact that no one really knows the long term health impact that medication can cause on a person’s body.

Instead, let’s dig deeper.

One day, I asked Mike to explain to me in writing why he had struggled so much when it came to taking his medication.



Published By Forum Admin, 2014-11-11 17:30:50 Read More...
Med & Health News

Treating Ebola: The Hunt for a Drug

The Ebola Drug Pipeline

The World Health Organization has said that it is ethical to use unproven drugs in the current epidemic. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration has granted expanded access to several experimental drugs for use on Ebola patients. The drugs prevent replication of Ebola virus and the vaccines work by triggering an immune response. The drugs and vaccines listed here are in clinical trials and have received support for further development, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.



Published By Lindsay, 2014-10-28 16:36:27 Read More...
Featured Topics

Andeonia Patients Restors the Ability to Experience PleasureWithin Minutes in Depressed Patients Within Minutes with Ketamine

Ketamine Restores Ability to Experience Pleasure in Depressed Patients Within Minutes

ketamine
Ketamine
Filed Under: Tech & Science, Drugs, Depression, Health and Medicine

There are many faces to depression: sadness, hopelessness, trouble sleeping, lack of motivation, an inability to experience pleasure.

That last one has a medical name—anhedonia—and people experiencing it often no longer enjoy activities that used to bring happiness. Anhedonia is not found just in depression; it can be an important part of other disorders, including schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and addiction.

In a study published this month in Translational Psychiatry, researchers have found that a drug called ketamine can help quickly reverse anhedonia in patients with treatment-resistant bipolar depression (also known as manic-depression or bipolar disorder).

 

Ketamine has previously been shown to help rapidly reverse other aspects of depression in a number of studies; doctors use the drug to treat patients at several hospitals around the country, although it remains illegal to possess without a prescription and hasn’t yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for psychiatric purposes. On the party drug circuit it’s sometimes called “Special K” and is abused for its anaesthetic and hallucinogenic effects.

The researchers found that a single injection of ketamine led to a significant improvement in normal pleasure-seeking behavior in as little as 40 minutes, and this dramatic improvement lasted as long as two weeks for some of the 36 participants.



Published By Lindsay, 2014-10-28 19:11:36 Read More...
Announcements

Petting Away Depression

You've seen the TV commercials, the person in black and white and sad while they watch their friends and family in color happy as can be? Then the sad individual gets help, sees the world in color and has a dog run into frame to play with them, or they are suddenly on the couch petting their beloved cat. Well, there's a reason for that, pets can help individuals with depression/illnesses/anxiety.

"Pets offer an unconditional love that can be very helpful to people with depression," says Ian Cook, MD, a psychiatrist and director of the Depression Research and Clinic Program at UCLA.

Depression affects millions of individuals in the USA alone. A lot of people reading this suffer from some form or know someone who does. A pet might not be right for everyone, so don't just show up with a pet one day for someone you know with depression.

 



Published By Lindsay, 2014-02-27 20:42:41 Read More...
Meds

Celexa May Help Ease Alzheimer's-Linked Agitation

Study finds it might be safer alternative to standard antipsychotics

 

TUESDAY, Feb. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The antidepressant Celexa shows promise in easing the agitation people with Alzheimer's disease often suffer, and may offer a safer alternative to antipsychotic drugs, a new study finds.

"Agitation is one of the worst symptoms for patients and their families: it puts the Alzheimer's patient at risk for other system overloads (cardiac, infection), wears them out physically, and exhausts caregivers and families," noted one expert, Dr. Alan Manevitz, a clinical psychiatrist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

He said that while antipsychotic drugs are typically used to help ease the agitation, they are also associated with a higher risk of death for Alzheimer's patients, so safer alternatives would be welcome.

The new study was led by Dr. Constantine Lyketsos, director of the Johns Hopkins Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center in Baltimore. It included 186 Alzheimer's patients with agitation symptoms such as emotional distress, aggression, irritability, and excessive movem

 

 

 



Published By Lindsay, 2014-02-19 18:21:07 Read More...
Stories

Speakers share about struggles with mental health

 

The diagnosis of bipolar disorder in her 20s came as a relief to Hope Richardson. There was finally a name for what she felt and something that could be done, she said. Because mental illness is a lifelong condition, staying well takes effort, and she's mindful of that every day.

Once afraid of others not liking her and unable to stand up for herself, Richardson said she often walked around with her head down and hair covering her face. She went through bouts of depression and struggled with anger, manic episodes and suicidal thoughts.

Early on, she was hesitant to talk about her condition.

"I didn't want people to know. I was kind of embarrassed and ashamed," said Richardson, 44, of Des Moines.

Through therapy and support, she has learned to "live with," rather than "suffer," mental illness and says the only way to end stigma is to educate others.

She's part of a group of trained speakers who open up about their disorders through In Our Own Voice, a public awareness program sponsored by the National Alliance for Mental Illness Greater Des Moines. The local chapter began offering the program last fall.

Sharing their stories serves as a type of ongoing therapy for the speakers and a chance to paint a realistic picture of mental illness, which affects one in four adults — about 61.5 million Americans every year. One in 17, or 13.6 million Americans, live with a serious mental condition such as schizophrenia, major depression or bipolar disorder.

 



Published By Lindsay, 2014-05-21 14:13:32 Read More...
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Member Testimonials
Hello to the forum. I'm a 30 year old guy with bi polar/schizo affective disorder. I've been battling mental illness my whole life. I've been reading through some of the topics the last couple of days, and decided to join tonight. I'm glad I found this place, it looks pretty active and full of insight. My thanks to the creators of the website for helping people with mental have a voice.
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Forum Admin  Forum Admin

Eating Disorders Organizations Website Information list

Eating Disorders Organizations List, Plus Support


Below is a list of Eating Disorders Organizations that you can contact for further help, information and support.

The non-profit organizations listed here can provide educational and written material, lecture information, referrals to treatment in your area, and more. Don't forget to also check out the Treatment Finder for a list of local therapists, treatment facilities, dietitians, nutritionists and support groups.
Please take advantage of this comprehensive list as there is a plethora of knowledge here at your fingertips. ~Lindsay


Eating Disorder Referral and Information Center
2923 Sandy Pointe, Suite 6
Del Mar, CA 92014-2052
858-481-1515
Answering any questions you might have about eating disorders and their prevention.

National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA)
Formerly EDAP & AABA
603 Stewart Street, Suite 803
Seattle, WA 98101-1264
Toll-Free (800) 931-2237
Phone (206) 382-3587
FAX (206) 829-8501
The National Eating Disorders Association is the largest nonprofit organization in the U.S. dedicated to expanding public understanding of eating disorders and promoting access to quality treatment for those affected along with support for their families through education, advocacy and research. To achieve our mission, we have developed prevention programs for a wide range of audiences, we publish and distribute educational materials, we operate the nation's first toll-free eating disorders information and referral line at 1-800-931-2237, and we continually work to change the cultural, familial, and interpersonal factors which contribute to the development of eating disorders.

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD)
Box 7
Highland Park, IL 60035
(847) 831-3438
An association that is concerned with and provides a wide variety of programs for the entire Eating Disorders field (consumer advocacy, counsel, education, referral list, research, etc.)

Eating Disorders Anonymous (EDA)
18233 N. 16th Way
Phoenix, AZ 85022
a fellowship of individuals who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problems and help others to recover from their eating disorders. People can and do fully recover from having an eating disorder. In EDA, we help one another identify and claim milestones of recovery.

Academy for Eating Disorders (AED)
6728 Old McLean Village Drive
McLean, VA 22101
(703) 556-9222
Promotes effective treatment and prevention initiatives, and stimulates research. AED sponsors an international conference.

The Elisa Project
8600 NW Plaza Drive, Suite 2B
Dallas, Texas 75225
(214) 369-5222
To be a cohesive resource in providing eating disorder sufferers with a better chance of a cure. We accomplish this by educating Health professionals, Parents, Children, The Community and The Funding Community.

National Center for Overcoming Overeating
P.O. Box 1257
Old Chelsea Station
New York, NY 10113-0920
(212) 875-0442
Women's Campaign to End Body Hatred and Dieting

Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness
PO Box 13155
North Palm Beach, FL 33408-3155
(561) 841-0900
Seeks to establish easily accessible programs across the nation that allow children and young adults the opportunity to learn about eating disorders.

Eating Disorders Coalition
609 10th Street NE, Suite #1
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 543-3842
To promote, at the federal level, further investment in the healthy development of children and all at risk for eating disorders, recognition of eating disorders as a public health priority, and commitment to effective prevention and evidence based and accessible treatment of these disorders.

Harvard Eating Disorders Center (HEDC)
356 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02118
1-888-236-1188
A national nonprofit organization dedicated to research and education, seeking to expand knowledge about Eating Disorders, their detection, treatment and prevention.

Massachusetts Eating Disorders Association, Inc. (MEDA)
92 Pearl Street
Newton, MA 02158
(617) 558-1881
Newsletter, referral network, and local support groups.

Overeaters Anonymous
P.O. Box 44020
Rio Rancho, New Mexico 87124-4020
(505) 891-2664
FAX (505) 891-4320
Dealing with the issues of Compulsive Overeating. Site contains information on OA, info for healthcare professionals, a meeting locator map, fact file, OA literature, upcoming events and more.

The National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC)
CW 1-211, 200 Elizabeth Street
Toronto, Ontario
416-340-4156
A non-profit organisation established in 1985 to provide information and resources on eating disorders and weight preoccupation.

Eating Disorders Association of Manitoba
PO BOX 34099 RPO Fort Richmond
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 5T5
(204) 275-3732
A provincial non-profit organization founded in April of 1998 to provide support for individuals that have a loved one that suffers from an eating disorder.

Eating Disorders Association (UK)
First Floor, Wensum House
103 Prince of Wales Road
NORWICH, NR 1 1DW
Norfolk, UK
01603 621 414
Offers understanding and support to sufferers and their families involved with the problems of Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa.

Somerset & Wessex Eating Disorders Association
Strode House, 10 Leigh Road
STREET, Somerset, BA16 0HA
or
18-25 Project, 20A High Street
GLASTONBURY, Somerset, BA6 9DU
01458 448600
Providing support to those affected by eating disorders; core services include the telephone helpline and support groups.

The Eating Disorders Action Group
150 Bedford Highway, #2614
Halifax, NS B3M 3J5
(902) 443-9944
The Eating Disorders Action Group is a community based, charitable organization dedicated to promoting healthy body image and self esteem and to supporting individuals who experience disordered eating.

ANAB Quebec
114 Donegani Boulevard
Pointe Claire, Quebec H9R 2V4
(514) 630-0907
ANAB Quebec is a Montreal-based non-profit organization that has been working since 1984 to help those whose lives are touched by an eating disorder.

Food Addicts Anonymous
to find a local group visit the website or call:
The World Service Office at: (561) 967-3871
National Food Addicts Anonymous Homepage -- information about the FAA recovery program. Worldwide events, on-line meetings, tools for recovery, 12 steps and 12 traditions and much more.

HUGS International Inc.
Contact:
Linda Omichinski, RD
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The center for information and resources about nondieting for adults and teens. We offer worldwide support and programs for people seeking a lifestyle without diets.

Eating Disorders Association Resource Center
The Eating Disorders Association is based in Queensland, Australia. It is an organization of people concerned about the growing prevalence and seriousness of eating disorders in our society.

Eating Disorders Association
Bryson House,
38 Ormeau Road,
Belfast 7
IRELAND
Sackville Place,
44 Magdalen Street,
Norwich, Norfolk NR3 1JE.
Tel 080 232 234914
Members all receive information about Eating Disorders, including the magazine Signpost

Eating Disorders Association of WA (Western Australia)
Eating Disorders
Unit 13A, Wellington Fair, 4 Lord Street, Perth
WESTERN AUSTRALIA 6000
TELEPHONE: 9221 0488
FAX: 9221 0499

British Columbia Eating Disorders Assocation
841 Fairfield Road
Victoria BC Canada
(250) 383-2755
Non-profit organization dedicated to peer support, peer counseling, and advocacy. We also run prevention programs for elementary, secondary schools and university/college classes. We are completely volunteer driven and supported!

Compulsive Eaters Anonymous - H.O.W
.
PO BOX 4403
10016 Pioneer Blvd Suite 101
Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
(310) 942-8161
fax (310) 948-3721
A twelve step recovery program.

Eating Disorders Professionals (IAEDP)
123 NW 13th St. #206
Boca Raton, FL 33432-1618
(800) 800-8126
fax (407) 338-9913
An organization providing education, newsletters, local chapters, monthly bulletins, regional workshops, and certification. Professional membership.

Promoting Legislation & Education About Self-Esteem, Inc. (PLEASE)
91 S Main Street
West Hartford, CT 06107
(860) 521-2515
Memberships and Educational Programs, Workshops, and local chapters. Watch-dog of the growing diet industry.

National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance, Inc. (NAAFA)
P.O. Box 188620
Sacramento, CA 95818
(800) 442-1214
Advocacy group promoting size acceptance. Membership newsletters, educational materials, regional chapters, yearly convention, and pen-pal program


The Something Fishy Website on Eating Disorders
Information on Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Compulsive Overeating. Eating Disorders definitions, signs and symptoms, physical dangers, treatment finder, online support and much more.

Reviewed and edited by Lindsay, Forum Super Admin 02-26-10

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