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       Our mission is to create an atmosphere that is both supportive and informative in a caring, safe environment for our members to talk to their peers about depression, anxiety, mood disorders, medications, therapy and recovery.


Our vision is to advance the public awareness of mental health issues so as to eliminate the stigma that surrounds depression and mood disorders through education and advocacy, as well as striving to obtain quality medical care for mental health patients, as it is no different from any other medical illness.

 

 
 
Newsworthy
Latest News

Let teens talk about mental illness

 

By Susan Antilla
updated 9:49 AM EDT, Tue May 27, 2014

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Two high school students tried to tell stories about teen mental illnesses
  •  
  • Susan Antilla: Schools need to have open conversations about mental health
  • She says kids suffering from mental illness crave information that can help them
  • Antilla: A town in Connecticut has seen good results when it fosters discussion

Editor's note: Susan Antilla is an award-winning financial writer and author of "Tales From the Boom-Boom Room: The Landmark Legal Battles That Exposed Wall Street's Shocking Culture of Sexual Harassment." Follow her on Twitter @antillaview. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

 

(CNN) -- Two high school students -- managing editors at their school newspaper in Ann Arbor, Michigan -- wrote a distressing op-ed that appeared recently in The New York Times.

Madeline Halpert, a junior, and Eva Rosenfeld, a sophomore, had undertaken a Herculean task. After bonding over the discovery that both were being treated for depression, they linked up with other journalism students and gathered highly personal stories about mental illness from teenagers in their school district.

Incredibly, all their subjects agreed to be identified. No unnamed sources. No pseudonyms. These were reporters who did their homework, and subjects who saw the merit of going public about their experiences with everything from depression and anxiety to eating disorders and drug abuse.

 

 



Published By Lindsay, 2014-05-30 18:48:11 Read More...
Psychotherapy

You, New and Improved

      Want to change? How to get to a new you.

                               Self-Esteem vs. Self-Acceptance

 

The Path to Unconditional Self-Acceptance

How do you fully accept yourself when you don't know how?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Though related, self-acceptance is not the same as self-esteem. Whereas self-esteem refers specifically to how valuable, or worthwhile, we see ourselves, self-acceptance alludes to a far more global affirmation of self. When we're self-accepting, we're able to embrace all facets of ourselves--not just the positive, more "esteem-able" parts. As such, self-acceptance is unconditional, free of any qualification. We can recognize our weaknesses, limitations, and foibles, but this awareness in no way interferes with our ability to fully accept ourselves.

 

I regularly tell my therapy clients that if they genuinely want to improve their self-esteem, they need to explore what parts of themselves they're not yet able to accept. For, ultimately, liking ourselves more (or getting on better terms with ourselves) has mostly to do with self-acceptance. And it's only when we stop judging ourselves that we can secure a more positive sense of who we are. Which is why I believe self-esteem rises naturally as soon as we cease being so hard on ourselves. And it's precisely because self-acceptance involves far more than self-esteem that I see it as crucial to our happiness and state of well-being.

 

 



Published By Lindsay, 2014-04-21 19:16:07 Read More...
Med & Health News

Signs You're Depressed — and Don't Know It


The beginning of the year is a bummer for many — the combination of dark days, no more holidays to look forward to and never-ending bad weather make this time of year ripe for Seasonal Affected Disorder, or clinical depression with a seasonal onset.
 
 



The major symptoms of SAD and clinical depression are the same, Dr. Brandon Gibb, a psychology professor at Binghamton University, told weather.com. You’ll experience an enduring sadness most of the day every day for at least two weeks. (It’s this duration that separates true clinical depression from a few sad moods.) You’ll also experience a loss of interest in activities you used to enjoy.

“The other really key thing is [depression] starts to get in the way of things: work, your ability to do your job, your relationships with people,” he said.

But for some people, there are more subtle signs, counterintuitive to traditional depressive symptoms. Even if you’re working hard at work and going out with your friends, you still could be depressed, in fact.

  Some people find it hard to accept compliments when they’re depressed or when their depression is starting to return. One explanation: A compliment disrupts a depressed person’s low self-esteem, so he or she refuses to accept it. Feeling self-centered (when’s the last time you complimented someone else?) is also a sign someone is retreating toward depression.

 



Published By Forum Admin, 2014-03-20 11:18:38 Read More...
Featured Topics

Mental Health Awareness Month: 10 things I know about mental illness

 

Mental Health Awareness Month: 10 things I know about mental illness

By Jessica Gardner, May 18, 2014 at 8:02 pm                                                                                                                                                                     Photo courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and although millions and millions of families are affected by mental health issues, I have found that mental illness is one of the least talked about topics. In fact, I would go so far as to call it taboo.

My family is no stranger to mental illness and how it wreaks havoc. As I've recently discovered, various degrees of mental illness go back generations.

This post isn't about my family in particular and I'm not going to get into specifics. That's a whole series of blog posts for another day. I only share with you that I have personal experience in this area in order to let you know that I know of what I speak. I'm also not a mental health professional and my statements below are my opinions, based on my experience.

 

  1. People with mental illness are not stupid or lazy. Some of the most intelligent and most accomplished people in the world have suffered from mental illness. Abraham Lincoln, Ernest Hemingway, Vincent Van Gogh, Michelangelo, Sylvia Plath, and Vivien Leigh are just a few people who are known to have suffered from mental illness and no one would call them stupid or lazy.
  2. People with mental illness don't want your pity or to be condescended to. First and foremost, people with mental illness want and deserve to be treated with respect. Take your cues from them. Be patient. They can't always get their thoughts out quickly, but by being patient and not rushing or cutting them off shows respect, treats them with dignity, and re-enforces their value as people.

 



Published By Lindsay, 2014-05-21 16:06:15 Read More...
Announcements

Petting Away Depression

You've seen the TV commercials, the person in black and white and sad while they watch their friends and family in color happy as can be? Then the sad individual gets help, sees the world in color and has a dog run into frame to play with them, or they are suddenly on the couch petting their beloved cat. Well, there's a reason for that, pets can help individuals with depression/illnesses/anxiety.

"Pets offer an unconditional love that can be very helpful to people with depression," says Ian Cook, MD, a psychiatrist and director of the Depression Research and Clinic Program at UCLA.

Depression affects millions of individuals in the USA alone. A lot of people reading this suffer from some form or know someone who does. A pet might not be right for everyone, so don't just show up with a pet one day for someone you know with depression.

 



Published By Lindsay, 2014-02-27 20:42:41 Read More...
Meds

Celexa May Help Ease Alzheimer's-Linked Agitation

Study finds it might be safer alternative to standard antipsychotics

 

TUESDAY, Feb. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The antidepressant Celexa shows promise in easing the agitation people with Alzheimer's disease often suffer, and may offer a safer alternative to antipsychotic drugs, a new study finds.

"Agitation is one of the worst symptoms for patients and their families: it puts the Alzheimer's patient at risk for other system overloads (cardiac, infection), wears them out physically, and exhausts caregivers and families," noted one expert, Dr. Alan Manevitz, a clinical psychiatrist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

He said that while antipsychotic drugs are typically used to help ease the agitation, they are also associated with a higher risk of death for Alzheimer's patients, so safer alternatives would be welcome.

The new study was led by Dr. Constantine Lyketsos, director of the Johns Hopkins Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center in Baltimore. It included 186 Alzheimer's patients with agitation symptoms such as emotional distress, aggression, irritability, and excessive movem

 

 

 



Published By Lindsay, 2014-02-19 18:21:07 Read More...
Stories

Speakers share about struggles with mental health

 

The diagnosis of bipolar disorder in her 20s came as a relief to Hope Richardson. There was finally a name for what she felt and something that could be done, she said. Because mental illness is a lifelong condition, staying well takes effort, and she's mindful of that every day.

Once afraid of others not liking her and unable to stand up for herself, Richardson said she often walked around with her head down and hair covering her face. She went through bouts of depression and struggled with anger, manic episodes and suicidal thoughts.

Early on, she was hesitant to talk about her condition.

"I didn't want people to know. I was kind of embarrassed and ashamed," said Richardson, 44, of Des Moines.

Through therapy and support, she has learned to "live with," rather than "suffer," mental illness and says the only way to end stigma is to educate others.

She's part of a group of trained speakers who open up about their disorders through In Our Own Voice, a public awareness program sponsored by the National Alliance for Mental Illness Greater Des Moines. The local chapter began offering the program last fall.

Sharing their stories serves as a type of ongoing therapy for the speakers and a chance to paint a realistic picture of mental illness, which affects one in four adults — about 61.5 million Americans every year. One in 17, or 13.6 million Americans, live with a serious mental condition such as schizophrenia, major depression or bipolar disorder.

 



Published By Lindsay, 2014-05-21 14:13:32 Read More...
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Forum Admin  Forum Admin

Eating Disorders Organizations Website Information list

Eating Disorders Organizations List, Plus Support


Below is a list of Eating Disorders Organizations that you can contact for further help, information and support.

The non-profit organizations listed here can provide educational and written material, lecture information, referrals to treatment in your area, and more. Don't forget to also check out the Treatment Finder for a list of local therapists, treatment facilities, dietitians, nutritionists and support groups.
Please take advantage of this comprehensive list as there is a plethora of knowledge here at your fingertips. ~Lindsay


Eating Disorder Referral and Information Center
2923 Sandy Pointe, Suite 6
Del Mar, CA 92014-2052
858-481-1515
Answering any questions you might have about eating disorders and their prevention.

National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA)
Formerly EDAP & AABA
603 Stewart Street, Suite 803
Seattle, WA 98101-1264
Toll-Free (800) 931-2237
Phone (206) 382-3587
FAX (206) 829-8501
The National Eating Disorders Association is the largest nonprofit organization in the U.S. dedicated to expanding public understanding of eating disorders and promoting access to quality treatment for those affected along with support for their families through education, advocacy and research. To achieve our mission, we have developed prevention programs for a wide range of audiences, we publish and distribute educational materials, we operate the nation's first toll-free eating disorders information and referral line at 1-800-931-2237, and we continually work to change the cultural, familial, and interpersonal factors which contribute to the development of eating disorders.

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD)
Box 7
Highland Park, IL 60035
(847) 831-3438
An association that is concerned with and provides a wide variety of programs for the entire Eating Disorders field (consumer advocacy, counsel, education, referral list, research, etc.)

Eating Disorders Anonymous (EDA)
18233 N. 16th Way
Phoenix, AZ 85022
a fellowship of individuals who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problems and help others to recover from their eating disorders. People can and do fully recover from having an eating disorder. In EDA, we help one another identify and claim milestones of recovery.

Academy for Eating Disorders (AED)
6728 Old McLean Village Drive
McLean, VA 22101
(703) 556-9222
Promotes effective treatment and prevention initiatives, and stimulates research. AED sponsors an international conference.

The Elisa Project
8600 NW Plaza Drive, Suite 2B
Dallas, Texas 75225
(214) 369-5222
To be a cohesive resource in providing eating disorder sufferers with a better chance of a cure. We accomplish this by educating Health professionals, Parents, Children, The Community and The Funding Community.

National Center for Overcoming Overeating
P.O. Box 1257
Old Chelsea Station
New York, NY 10113-0920
(212) 875-0442
Women's Campaign to End Body Hatred and Dieting

Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness
PO Box 13155
North Palm Beach, FL 33408-3155
(561) 841-0900
Seeks to establish easily accessible programs across the nation that allow children and young adults the opportunity to learn about eating disorders.

Eating Disorders Coalition
609 10th Street NE, Suite #1
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 543-3842
To promote, at the federal level, further investment in the healthy development of children and all at risk for eating disorders, recognition of eating disorders as a public health priority, and commitment to effective prevention and evidence based and accessible treatment of these disorders.

Harvard Eating Disorders Center (HEDC)
356 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02118
1-888-236-1188
A national nonprofit organization dedicated to research and education, seeking to expand knowledge about Eating Disorders, their detection, treatment and prevention.

Massachusetts Eating Disorders Association, Inc. (MEDA)
92 Pearl Street
Newton, MA 02158
(617) 558-1881
Newsletter, referral network, and local support groups.

Overeaters Anonymous
P.O. Box 44020
Rio Rancho, New Mexico 87124-4020
(505) 891-2664
FAX (505) 891-4320
Dealing with the issues of Compulsive Overeating. Site contains information on OA, info for healthcare professionals, a meeting locator map, fact file, OA literature, upcoming events and more.

The National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC)
CW 1-211, 200 Elizabeth Street
Toronto, Ontario
416-340-4156
A non-profit organisation established in 1985 to provide information and resources on eating disorders and weight preoccupation.

Eating Disorders Association of Manitoba
PO BOX 34099 RPO Fort Richmond
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 5T5
(204) 275-3732
A provincial non-profit organization founded in April of 1998 to provide support for individuals that have a loved one that suffers from an eating disorder.

Eating Disorders Association (UK)
First Floor, Wensum House
103 Prince of Wales Road
NORWICH, NR 1 1DW
Norfolk, UK
01603 621 414
Offers understanding and support to sufferers and their families involved with the problems of Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa.

Somerset & Wessex Eating Disorders Association
Strode House, 10 Leigh Road
STREET, Somerset, BA16 0HA
or
18-25 Project, 20A High Street
GLASTONBURY, Somerset, BA6 9DU
01458 448600
Providing support to those affected by eating disorders; core services include the telephone helpline and support groups.

The Eating Disorders Action Group
150 Bedford Highway, #2614
Halifax, NS B3M 3J5
(902) 443-9944
The Eating Disorders Action Group is a community based, charitable organization dedicated to promoting healthy body image and self esteem and to supporting individuals who experience disordered eating.

ANAB Quebec
114 Donegani Boulevard
Pointe Claire, Quebec H9R 2V4
(514) 630-0907
ANAB Quebec is a Montreal-based non-profit organization that has been working since 1984 to help those whose lives are touched by an eating disorder.

Food Addicts Anonymous
to find a local group visit the website or call:
The World Service Office at: (561) 967-3871
National Food Addicts Anonymous Homepage -- information about the FAA recovery program. Worldwide events, on-line meetings, tools for recovery, 12 steps and 12 traditions and much more.

HUGS International Inc.
Contact:
Linda Omichinski, RD
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The center for information and resources about nondieting for adults and teens. We offer worldwide support and programs for people seeking a lifestyle without diets.

Eating Disorders Association Resource Center
The Eating Disorders Association is based in Queensland, Australia. It is an organization of people concerned about the growing prevalence and seriousness of eating disorders in our society.

Eating Disorders Association
Bryson House,
38 Ormeau Road,
Belfast 7
IRELAND
Sackville Place,
44 Magdalen Street,
Norwich, Norfolk NR3 1JE.
Tel 080 232 234914
Members all receive information about Eating Disorders, including the magazine Signpost

Eating Disorders Association of WA (Western Australia)
Eating Disorders
Unit 13A, Wellington Fair, 4 Lord Street, Perth
WESTERN AUSTRALIA 6000
TELEPHONE: 9221 0488
FAX: 9221 0499

British Columbia Eating Disorders Assocation
841 Fairfield Road
Victoria BC Canada
(250) 383-2755
Non-profit organization dedicated to peer support, peer counseling, and advocacy. We also run prevention programs for elementary, secondary schools and university/college classes. We are completely volunteer driven and supported!

Compulsive Eaters Anonymous - H.O.W
.
PO BOX 4403
10016 Pioneer Blvd Suite 101
Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
(310) 942-8161
fax (310) 948-3721
A twelve step recovery program.

Eating Disorders Professionals (IAEDP)
123 NW 13th St. #206
Boca Raton, FL 33432-1618
(800) 800-8126
fax (407) 338-9913
An organization providing education, newsletters, local chapters, monthly bulletins, regional workshops, and certification. Professional membership.

Promoting Legislation & Education About Self-Esteem, Inc. (PLEASE)
91 S Main Street
West Hartford, CT 06107
(860) 521-2515
Memberships and Educational Programs, Workshops, and local chapters. Watch-dog of the growing diet industry.

National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance, Inc. (NAAFA)
P.O. Box 188620
Sacramento, CA 95818
(800) 442-1214
Advocacy group promoting size acceptance. Membership newsletters, educational materials, regional chapters, yearly convention, and pen-pal program


The Something Fishy Website on Eating Disorders
Information on Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Compulsive Overeating. Eating Disorders definitions, signs and symptoms, physical dangers, treatment finder, online support and much more.

Reviewed and edited by Lindsay, Forum Super Admin 02-26-10

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