• No one should be alone in this. We can help.
If you - or someone you know - are having thoughts about suicide, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Calls are connected to a certified crisis center nearest the caller's location. Services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.                                                                            If you - or someone you know - are having thoughts about suicide, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Calls are connected to a certified crisis center nearest the caller's location. Services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
Advertisement

Main Menu
Sponsored Links
Donate to DF
Latest Forum Topics
No posts were found
Search

Find a Therapist
Powered by Good Therapy
Depression Forums Welcomes You!
 
 


 


  Welcome to Depression Forums
  

 

 

 

Our mission is to create an atmosphere that is both supportive and informative in a caring, safe environment for our members to talk to their peers about depression, anxiety, mood disorders, medications, therapy and recovery.


Our vision is to advance the public awareness of mental health issues so as to eliminate the stigma that surrounds depression and mood disorders through education and advocacy, as well as striving to obtain quality medical care for mental health patients, as it is no different from any other medical illness.

 

Newsworthy
Latest News

People seeking treatment for depression may not be getting all the information they want

Disconnect in informational priorities between those seeking treatment for depression, clinicians

More than 15 million American adults seek treatment for depression each year. However, a first-of-its-kind study reveals an eye-opening disconnect between the priorities of patients and clinicians when it comes to the information needed to make decisions about treatment options.

More than 15 million American adults seek treatment for depression each year. However, a first-of-its-kind study by researchers at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice reveals an eye-opening disconnect between the priorities of patients and clinicians when it comes to the information needed to make decisions about treatment options.

"The good news is that both patients and clinicians who treat depression consider whether a treatment will work to be the most important priority," said Paul Barr, an assistant professor at The Dartmouth Institute and the study's lead author. "However, while consumers place a high priority on cost and insurance information, clinicians do not always prioritize this as highly."

The study, published online by BMJ Open, surveyed close to 1,000 Americans who were currently undergoing or have previously sought treatment for depression and 250 clinicians who had recently treated patients for depression in the United States. Patients were recruited to reflect the age, gender and education level of the population of U.S. adults suffering from depression. Clinicians surveyed had an average of 15 years of professional experience and included therapists, psychiatrists and primary care physicians.



Published By Lindsay, 2016-01-19 18:31:05 Read More...
Psychotherapy

Is Internet-based mental health care as effective as in-person therapy?

 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Online

 

Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is not recommended for severely ill patients, and research findings do not support a DIY approach. (istockphoto)

 

Let’s say you’ve been down in the dumps for months, but are leery of taking psychiatric drugs. Your doctor may recommend cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), a form of “talk therapy” that focuses on changing the underlying thought patterns and distorted perceptions that perpetuate the “stinkin’ thinkin’” brought on by mood disorders. Several trials have shown that CBT is just as effective as medication, and highly successful in treating mild to moderate depression and anxiety. But what if you don’t have the time or money to see a therapist?

You could go online. In the past 10 years, dozens of Internet-delivered CBT programs have cropped up, many of them free of charge. In countries such as Australia and Britain, computerized CBT is being touted as a cost-effective way to treat greater numbers of patients suffering from the most common mental illnesses – mild to moderate anxiety and depression.

But is online CBT as effective as face-to-face sessions with a compassionate therapist? Advocates note that some patients prefer the anonymity of Internet-delivered CBT, even as they acknowledge that the treatment model still needs tweaking. Critics insist that mentally ill patients need the human touch. Both agree that more research is needed, but as things stand, here are the promises and pitfalls of psychotherapy at your fingertips.

How does it work?

Using a computer, tablet or smartphone, patients log on to an online program such as Beating the Blues or MoodGYM (which has at least 600,000 registered users worldwide). At their own pace, patients complete interactive modules on how to identify symptoms, set goals and find new ways of thinking about everyday events. For example, a module might teach the “three Cs”: Catch the unhelpful thought (“I am an idiot for forgetting my friend’s birthday”). Check it to identify the distorted thinking pattern (over-generalizing, focusing on the negative). Change it to a more accurate or helpful thought (“Everyone makes mistakes,” and “I am a good friend most of the time”). Online CBT programs may include quizzes, homework exercises and self-assessments to monitor progress.

Does it help people recover from mental illness?



Published By Lindsay, 2015-12-15 18:11:30 Read More...
Med & Health News

Depression and teens

Learning that your teen has depression can be terrifying for a parent – concerns range from getting the right treatment to general safety. It was estimated in 2013 that 8 percent of high school students attempted suicide one or more times in the previous 12 months, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And now, a reanalysis of data in The BMJ last week found that Paxil, one of the most prescribed antidepressants on the market, is ineffective and even harmful for treating major depression in adolescents.

The new findings are in contrast to the original study from 2001. Researchers of the original industry-funded study found Paxil, just one of a group of serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, was safe and effective. The reanalysis showed that a number of adolescents from the original study did experience increased thoughts of suicide. But the suicidal thoughts were simply counted as generic adverse events and not clearly presented in the results.

For a long time, there have been some indications that these medicines may raise the rates of thoughts of self-harm in adolescents. This led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2007 to issue a “black box” warning about increases in suicidal thoughts. In December 2014, the warning was revised to state that attempts at self-harm decreased in patients ages 24 and older with anti-depressant use, but there was no change on the warning for adolescents.

During this nearly decade long discussion, most psychiatrists and many other mental health professionals felt that the warnings were too strict. As a result, they thought many teens were not getting the help that they needed – while others worried that these medicines were possibly harmful. 

What has followed in the wake of this latest reanalysis are stories in the press which have raised the issue of the safety and effectiveness of some antidepressant medications for adolescents.  

 



Published By Lindsay, 2015-09-24 15:23:31 Read More...
Featured Topics

DEPRESSED IN THE CITY: 1 in 5 New Yorkers suffer from mental health disorders

 

 

 

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Thursday, November 12, 2015, 1:55 PM
 
For editorial use only. Additional clearance required for commercial or promotional use, contact your local office for assistance. Any commercial or promotional use of Bloomberg content requires Bloomberg's prior written consent. 

At least 8% of New York City residents suffer from symptoms of depression, a new report by the city Department of Health says.

We're the Big Blue Apple.

One in five New Yorkers have a mental health disorder, and at least 8% suffer from symptoms of depression, a new report by the city Department of Health says.

“Major depressive disorder is the single greatest source of disability in NYC,” the report says. "At any given time over half a million adult New Yorkers are estimated to have depression, yet less than 40% report receiving care for it.”

 



Published By Lindsay, 2015-11-13 17:01:31 Read More...
Announcements

Depression — What It Is & How To Recognize It

Feeling depressed and having depression

 
Photographed by Ben Lamberty.
Despite lots of advancements in the psychology world, many aspects of depression remain mysterious, to mental health professionals and their patients alike. The video below, one of the latest from TEDEd, suggests that this is due to the condition's intangibility — depression isn't a cold or some other illness with physical symptoms that are clear and consistent. However, the video, created by Helen M. Farrell, MD, provides some insight into what depression is, and what signs to look for (in yourself and your loved ones).
 
 
It's vital to understand the difference between feeling depressed and having depression. Just about all people deal with feelings of sadness, but they pass or are eventually (at times, even easily) resolved. Depression, on the other hand, lasts much longer, following those who suffer from it to the point that they may lose hope of finding a solution. Clinical depression, as explained in this video, can cause sufferers to avoid activities or people that used to excite and engage them, exacerbating the sense of guilt and worthlessness that also accompanies the condition. A lack of energy, appetite, and concentration commonly occurs as well. Most alarmingly, people with depression may deal with recurring thoughts of suicide.


Published By Lindsay, 2015-12-16 20:54:09 Read More...
Meds

Rethinking How We Diagnose Psychosis

MIND Guest BlogMIND Guest Blog

A new study opens a door to more biologically based categories of major mental illness


©iStock.com

If you are unfortunate enough to develop acute chest pain this winter you will probably be assessed by a clinician who will order a battery of tests to determine if your symptoms result from pneumonia, bronchitis, heart disease, or something else. These tests not only can yield a precise diagnosis, they ensure you will receive the appropriate treatment for your specific illness.

If you are unfortunate enough to have a psychotic episode this winter, the process of arriving at a diagnosis will be quite different. In fact, there are not many choices. Most people with a psychotic disorder are labeled as having either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. The distinction has been in textbooks for a century: schizophrenia (originally dementia praecox) is associated with delusions, hallucinations, an absence of affect, and a chronic course; bipolar (originally manic depressive disorder) can also involve delusions and hallucinations, and ,typically, dramatic swings in mood and a fluctuating course. But outside of textbooks, in the real world of the emergency room or clinic, these distinctions are less clear as many patients do not neatly fit the formal descriptions. Sadly, there are no blood tests or scans to distinguish schizophrenia from bipolar disorder.

While clinicians have become very skilled at assessing symptoms and signs, the absence of diagnostic laboratory tools or biomarkers poses a serious problem in psychiatry. Do all people with a label of schizophrenia have the same disorder? What about the large number of people who appear to have aspects of both schizophrenia and bipolar? Are these disorders, diagnosed exclusively by signs and symptoms, identifying distinct biological entities or could there be many different illnesses with a continuum of psychotic signs and symptoms? These questions are not merely academic.  As with chest pain, getting a precise diagnosis is important for selecting the best treatment. 



Published By Lindsay, 2015-12-15 19:03:40 Read More...
Stories

No Shame in Having Depression and Anxiety

 

 

“Dude, what’s your problem?”

by Josh Lewin

Josh LewinI have learned that anxiety and depression go hand-in-hand, and there is no shame in having either — although it’s tough for many people to get their arms around that concept. When I struggled with both in my last couple years as the Texas Rangers’ baseball play-by-play announcer, the few people in whom I confided expressed genuine shock. “Depressed? About what? You’ve got a great job! Legions of adoring fans! A wonderful family! Dude, what’s your problem?”

Growing up, I had always been, quite naturally, the life of any party. But over a period of several years, I began to stay away from such parties. When I did go and fake my way through, I would usually leave upset, gripped by the weight of having been such a fraud.

Scared, Lonely, Exhausted

At my lowest moments, everything and everyone in the world was a threat. Not just people I knew, but people I knew I’d never meet. Brad Pitt’s looks? A threat. Same for Peyton Manning’s arm, Josh Groban’s voice, Justin Timberlake’s talent, the neighbor’s house...all things to threaten me, instead of for me to simply enjoy.
 
In an anxious state, all I could see were the things I couldn’t do or didn’t have, and people I couldn’t be. I had no appreciation whatsoever of anything I already was. No matter what I did, the foreboding sense was that it would never be enough. And if the people in my life who mattered had the “gall” to appreciate or acknowledge the talents of others, I took it as a punch in the face. It was a scary, lonely, exhausting way to go through life.

The crux of an anxiety disorder is the complete inability to be at peace with the present moment. Always expecting the other shoe to drop. Waiting for something to go wrong. I’d be racked with guilt about things I’d done poorly and trembling with worry that I’d soon screw something else up too. Professionally, that would all come crashing down within an hour of air time. Quite routinely, I’d seek refuge in the press box bathroom, head in my hands, trying to remind myself “it’s okay. I’m okay.” Sometimes I was…most times I wasn’t.

 



Published By Lindsay, 2015-12-15 18:49:03 Read More...
Advertisement
Member Testimonials
I haven't tried much to help with my depression. I find this DF does help me since there always someone online that willing to listen and give me some sort support. So far my medication isn't helping nor is my pdoc.
(livingwithBPD)

Seasons

 
 
  
This Month In Pictures
Sydni2.jpg
Members Online
0 Users Online
Guests
Visible
No users online.
Follow Us On Twitter
Like Us On Facebook
Medical News
Suicide Prevention Lifeline
suicidepreventionlifeline.org
Andertoon
Daily Toon Click to enlarge
ANDERTOONS.COM PSYCHIATRY CARTOONSPsychiatry Cartoonsby Andertoons
Tweets Liked by ~ Lindsay (@DepressionForum)
Depression Forums - A Depression & Mental Health Community Support Group
Copyright © 2014 The Depression Forums Incorporated - A Depression & Mental Health Social Community Support Group. All rights reserved.
The Depression Forums are intended to enable members to benefit from the experience of other members who have faced similar mental health issues by sharing their experiences.
* DF does NOT vouch for or warrant the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any posting or the qualifications of any person responding.
Use of the Forums is subject to our Terms Of Service (TOS) and forum guidelines which prohibit advertisements, solicitations or other commercial messages by members, or false, defamatory, abusive, vulgar, or harassing messages and may subject violators to be banned from the forums.
All postings reflect the views of the author but become the property of DepressionForums.org. Your personal information will never be shared with others.
If you have any questions on how it will be used, please see our our privacy policy.
Information supplied on Depression Forums should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for medical advice from a health professional or doctor.
* DF © is an acronym for DepressionForums.org